The Bay Area

Chinese, Sonoma, Napa, Solano, Marin, San Mateo, Contra Costa, San Francisco, Alameda, Santa Clara


Alameda County
Alvarado Chinatown, Alameda County.
Alvarado Chinatown was in the City of Alvarado on the north side of Smith Street and east of
Walkins Street about one-quarter mile from the railroad depot
. By 1925, it contained two grocery
stores, a lodging facility, restaurant and seven dwellings
. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map
1925.


Asian Branch Library, Alameda County.
The community felt a need for a library that would serve the Oakland Chinatown. Fund raising
efforts by Asian Americans in the area and a large grant made the library possible
. The Asia
Branch Library at 388 Ninth Street is part of the Oakland Public Library system
. See Oakland
Chinatown, Alameda County. Reference: Ma and Ma 19, 82: 56
.
Asian Health Services Offices, Alameda County.
Initiated in 1973, the Asian Health Services Offices at 310 Eighth Street, provides medical and
mental health services to low income Chinatown families. See Oakland Chinatown, Alameda
County. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 98.
Asian Resources Center Marker, Alameda County.
The marker is at 301 9th street, City of Oakland. it commemorates the women of Chinatown who sewed parachutes during WWII. Reference: Swackhamer 2014.

Asian Law Caucus Center, Alameda County.
Based in Oakland, the Asian Law Caucus Center at 1332 Webster Street, provided free or low
cost legal services to Chinatown residents in the early 1980s. See Oakland Chinatown, Alameda
County. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 99.
Berkeley Chinese Business Area, Alameda County.
A small cluster of Chinese businesses were located in the City of Berkeley on the east side of
Shattuck Street between Blake Street and Parker Street by January of 1894
. Reference: Sanborn
Insurance Map 1894.


 Chinese Community Center, Alameda County.

Chinese Community Center opened in 1953 at 300 Ninth Street in the City of Oakland. Its goal
is that of preserving Chinese culture. There is a bust of Joe Shoong
, the center's benefactor, in
the lobby. Both Joe and his wife Rose were instrumental in the development of the center. See
Joe Shoong House, Alameda County; Oakland Chinatown, Alameda County. Reference: Office
of Historic Preservation 1986.

Chung Mei Home, Alameda County.

Chung Mei Home in Berkeley was a Baptist-sponsored home for Chinese boys. It housed
orphans as well as the sons of men needing child care help--particularly when the wife was in
China. There were usually 70-80 boys in residence that could stay through their teen years. The
home eventually relocated and became part of Armstrong College in El Cerrito, Contra Costa
County. The home officially closed in 1954. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 45-47; Louie 1996.

Doh On Yuen, Alameda County.

Doh On Yuen on Eighth Street in Oakland Chinatown is a low cost, senior citizen housing
project. It has forty eight units and opened in 1969. See Oakland Chinatown, Alameda County.
Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 94.

Fong Wan Herb Company Building, Alameda County.
Constructed in 1923-1924, the Fong Wan Herb Company building at 576 Tenth Street, City of
Oakland, featured a Chinese facade similar to that found in San Francisco Chinatown
. The
building's first occupant was Fong Wan
, a China-born herbalist who became prominent in the
struggle to legitimize
, both legally and medically, herbalism in the United States during the
1920s and 1930s. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1984.
Hayward Chinese Business Area, Alameda County.
The City of Hayward contained four Chinese laundries in close proximity along Castro Avenue
by June, 1888. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1888b
.
Joe Shoong House, Alameda County.
Located at 385 Bellevue Avenue, City of Oakland, Joe Shoong House was built for him in 1922.
The house, actually a mansion
, was designed by Julia Morgan. Shoong, founder of the National
Dollar Store, hosted Chiang Kai-shek at the residence. See Chinese Community Center, Alameda
County; National Dollar Store, Santa Clara County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation
1986.
Lake Chabot Chinese Laborers Monument, Alameda County.
Lake Chabot Chinese Laborers Monument commemorates the Chinese workers who helped build
the reservoir known as Lake Chabot
. Construction of the 3.4 billion gallon system began in 1874.
It was completed in 1892
, supplying Oakland with its water. Chinese workers moved over
600,000 cubic yards of earth, constructed more than 15 mi
les of roads, dug ditches--one over
four miles long--and constructed three tunnels with a combined length of more than 2
,700 feet.
Over 800 Chinese at a time worked on the project with several losing their lives. The Alameda
Historical Society dedicated a monument and plaque to the Chinese laborers in 1997. The
monument is near Tunnel No
.3 on the upper road to Chabot Park. Notice the Tree of Heaven
throughout the area. See Yema Po
, Alameda County; Yema Po Exhibit and Mural, Alameda
County
. Reference: Beggs 1997: 20-24.
Lincoln School, Alameda County.
Lincoln School, at Tenth Street and Alice Street, was the public school of Oakland Chinatown.
Its beginning can be traced to 1865. Most every child of Chinatown attended the school at one
time or another
. See Wa Kue School, Alameda County. See Oakland Chinatown, Alameda
County
. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 56.
Ming Quong Orphanage, Alameda County.
Established in 1915 by Presbyterians in Oakland Chinatown, Ming Quong Orphanage served as
a home for Chinese girls. Eventually
, it occupied a building designed in 1923 by Julia Morgan
for the Chinese community. A property exchange with Mills College saw the college acquire the
Morgan building, renamed Alderwood Hall, and Ming Quong moving to Lake Merritt in 1935
.
Some of the young girls were relocated to Los Gatos in a facility known as Sunshine Cottage.
Expansion and relocation within Los Gatos resulted in the Ming Quong Children's Center
. See Ming Quong Children's Center, Santa Clara County. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 44-47
Hoover 1990: 21; Louie 1996; Wong 1971: 176-195.


Oakland Chinatown, Alameda County.
In the early 1860's there was a small Chinatown around Washington Street and Fourteenth Street
in the City of Oakland. However, it did not persist
, for the Chinese were forced out in 1865. A
new Chinatown established itself at Telegraph Street and Seventeenth Street that same year but
was destroyed by fire in 1867. Other Chinatowns started at San Pablo Street and Nineteenth
Street, San Pablo and Twenty Second Street and Eighth Street between Webster Street and
Washington Street
. All but the one at Eighth Street and Webster Street were gone by 1900.
Known as Oakland Chinatown, it provided workers for the infrastructure and industry that still
characterizes Oakland today. It was also an important place for refugees from the 1906
earthquake/fire that destroyed much of San Francisco Chinatown
. Today, it covers a little more
than four blocks and continues to be a focal point of commerce and social interaction. Reference:
Chou 1987: 100-102; Chow 1976: 1'-17; Ma and Ma 1982: 7-10, 28-31; Office of Historic
Preservation 1985a.

Oakland Chinese Presbyterian Church, Alameda County.
Oakland Chinese Presbyterian Church began in the 1860's as an English language class, officially
became a church in 1878. Located at 619 Harrison Street, City of Oakland, by 1906, the church
moved to 265 Eighth Street in 1925. See Ming Quong Orphanage
, Alameda County. Reference:
Ma and Ma 1982: 39-41.

Oakland Museum, Alameda County.
Oakland Museum at 1000 Oak Street, City of Oakland, has Chinese artifacts and various Chinese
collections on display.

Pacific Coast Canning Company, Alameda County.
Founded in 1903 by Lew Hing, Pacific Coast Canning Company was located at 1111 Pine Street,
City of Oakland
, and covered two blocks of West Oakland waterfront. It was most likely the
single largest employer of Chinese in Oakland and one of the city's largest businesses. During
peak months, it employed as many as 1,000 workers. The Stock Market Crash of the 1920s and
the global economic depression of the 1930's prompted the end of the enterprise. Reference
:
Office of Historic Preservation 1990b.

Peking Low Cafe Building, Alameda County.
Peking Low Cafe building is located at 700 Franklin Street, City of Oakland. Characterized by a
style of ancient Chinese architecture, it was featured in several prominent publications after it
was completed in 1924. See Oakland Chinatown, Alameda County
. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1985b
.

San Leandro Chinese Business Area, Alameda County.
The San Leandro Chinese business area was on the south side of what was then known as
Walkins Street between San Leandro Creek and Davis Street in the town of San Leandro. It  consisted of three laundries and two dwellings in August 1890. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1890.
Sargent Quan Hong American Legion Post No. 680, Alameda County.
Sargent Quan Hong American Legion Post No. 680 was located at 927 Webster Street, City of
Oakland, in the 1940's
. It provided support and camaraderie for Chinese American veterans
returning from military service after World War II
. Its many programs included child welfare to
widows and orphans. However, by the 1980's its membership had declined and the post was
deactivated. Reference: American Legion 1999
Shinn Pond, Alameda County.
Shinn Pond, Shinn Street and Shinn Station are place names in the Niles District of Fremont that
some might consider to be related to the Chinese
. But, they originate with James Shinn, a
Euro American from Ohio
, who settled in Alameda County in 1856. He started a gravel quarry in
the 1860' s (now Shinn Pond) with a street being named after him (Shinn Street) as was a Western
Pacific Railroad station (Shinn Station)
. Reference: Mosier and Mosier 1986: 81.
Shinn Street, Alameda County.
See Shinn Pond, Alameda County.
Shinn Station, Alameda County.
See Shinn Pond, Alameda County.
Wa Kue School, Alameda County.
Wa Kue School was the largest of the Chinese schools within Oakland Chinatown. Dating to
1921, it provided education in the Chinese language and culture to the young people of
Chinatown
. It closed the doors of its 387 Ninth Street location in 1953. See Oakland Chinatown,
Alameda Count
y. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 57.
Wa Sung  Community Service Club, Junk Boat Project. Alameda County.
The Junk Boat Project is located at 250 10th Street, Lincoln Square, City of Oakland. The rebuilt play area has numerous plaques that tell the story of the Chinese in the area. Reference: Swackhamer 2014.

Yema Po, Alameda County.
Yema Po is on the southern bank of San Leandro Creek, west of the Lake Chabot Spillway. It
was the camp site of the Chinese who worked on the dam that created Lake Chabot
. The
placename means Wild Horse Slope in a Cantonese dialect and is thought to refer to the 200 wild
horses used to pack down dirt during the construction of the dam. See Lake Chabot Chinese
Laborers Monument, Alameda County; Vema Po Exhibit and Mural
, Alameda County.
Reference: Bulletin of the Chinese Historical Society of America 1991: 1.
Yema Po Exhibit and Mural, Alameda County.
The Yema Po exhibit features some of the 60,000 artifacts recovered from the Yema Po site.
Both the exhibit and mural can be seen at the East Bay Municipal Utility District Administration
Center
, 375 Eleventh Street, Oakland. See Lake Chabot Chinese Laborers Monument, Alameda
Count
y; Vema Po, Alameda County. Reference: Beggs 1997: 8. 

Yuk Yau Children Center, Alameda County.
Yuk Yau Children Center is at Twelfth Street and Harrison Street in Oakland Chinatown. It is
a day care facility for children of new immigrants. Parents helped name the school, choosing Yuk
Yau that means "Educate the Young." The Center is part of the Oakland Unified School District.
See Oakland Chinatown
, Alameda County. Reference: Ma and Ma 1982: 97.

Yun Lin Temple, Alameda County.
This is the first temple in the United States of the Black Hat Sect of Tibetan Buddhism. It was
founded by Yun Lin in the 1980's. He is a prominent feng shui practitioner and authority. The
Temple is at 2959 Russell Street
, City of Berkeley. Reference: Rossback 1987: 177-78.

Contra Costa County

Antioch Chinese Business Area, Contra Costa County.
Located on Front Street between Main Street and Galloway Street next to the San Joaquin River
in the community of Antioch
, the Antioch Chinese business area contained two laundries and
two dwellings in 1884. However
, they were gone by 1900. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map
1900
, 1884a.

Castro Point Chinese Fish Camp, Contra Costa County.
Castro Point Chinese Fish Camp was located between Castro Point and present-day Western
Drive in the City of Richmond. Established in the 1880's, the camp
's population of approximately
100 Chinese netted shrimp in the nearby water. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1975.

Hercules Powder Plant, Contra Costa County.
Chinese laborers provided most of the work force for the Hercules Powder Plant, a manufacturer
of dynamite. In operation by the early 1880's, it was essentially a company town on San Pablo
Bay that provided employment and living facilities. As many as 375 Chinese occupied two
dormitories geographically separated from the other workers. Currently
, the plant is being
developed as a state park that commemorates
, among other things, those who lost their lives
while manufacturing explosives. Reference: Wey 1988: 138.

John Swett Winery, Contra Costa County.
The site of John Swett Winery is a little less than two miles south of the town of Martinez. The
winery was built b
y Chinese workers in the mid to late 1870's. The Chinese also formed the
largest group of grape handlers. Reference: Office Of Historic Preservation 1980a.

Martinez Chinese Business Area, Contra Costa County.
The Martinez Chinese business area, town of Martinez, was located on the south side of Main
Street next to EI Hombre Creek. By March, 1884, it consisted of one laundry and three
dwellings. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1884c.
Richmond Chinatown, Contra Costa County.
Centered on Clement Street in the City of Richmond, Richmond Chinatown developed because
of the rising costs of housing in San Francisco Chinatown
. It began to emerge in the 1970's, being
the home of Chinese and other Asian groups. Reference: Yip 1985: 368-369.
Tao House, Contra Costa County.
The Tao House, so-called because of it owner's appreciation of things Chinese, displays
numerous architectural features of what was then perceived as "oriental." Its front door was red,
simulating Chinese lacquer work, a motif that continued within the interior. The house
, in
Danville, was home for Eugene O'Neill and his wife Carlotta Montere
y from 1937 to 1944.
Originally, the estate co
vered 156 acres and consisted of a two-story house painted white with
a black tile roof
. Today, only 13.19 acres of the land and house form a National Historic
Landmark that is administered jointly by the National Park Service and the Eugene O'Neill
Foundation. Reference
: Bogart 1989: 10, 14; Bogart 1993: 21-22; Hoover 1990: 65.
Union Settlement, Contra Costa County.
By 1910, the Chinese Union Shrimp Company had established a shrimp fishing settlement on
Point San Pablo. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62. 

Marin County

Angel Island, Marin County.
In the past, Angel Island located in San Francisco Bay had been a Mexican rancho, United States
military post and World War II defense site. In 1910, it became a major facility for detaining
Chinese and other Asian immigrants and the administration of the Chinese Exclusion Laws. It
closed in 1940. Today
, it is a California State Park and California Historical Landmark No. 529.
See China Cove
, Marin County, Angel Island, Marin County. Reference: Lai 1978: 88-103.
China Camp Road, Marin County.
The road is the only approach into China Camp within China Camp State Park, thus its name.
See China Camp State Park, Marin County.
China Camp State Park, Marin County.
One of about thirty Chinese fishing camps around San Francisco Bay, China Camp is on a cove
that was an excellent shrimping ground. In the 1880's
, some 500 Chinese and their service
businesses could be found along the shore. After 1910, restrictions on fishing methods
, a ban on
dried shrimp exports and bass-taking greatly reduced the Chinese presence in the shrimping
business. The state acquired 1
,500 acres along the cove's edge in 1977 and memorialized its
significance with the name
, "China Camp State Park." The Yerba Buena Chapter No.1 of the
E. Clampus Vitus commemorated the area
with a plaque in 1979. In 1980, the State Department
of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the Marin Chinese Cultural Group also erected a
plaque at the site. It is California Historical Landmark No. 924. See China Camp Cove
, Marin
County; China Camp Point, Marin County; China Camp Road, Marin County
; Quong Sing Lung Settlement, Marin County; Wa Jen Ha Lio, Marin County. Reference: Jones 1954:1; Office of Historic Preservation 1990a: 1 06; United States Geological Survey 1959. Photo.

China Cove, Marin County.
China Cove1 is a small indentation in the coastline of San Francisco Bay that became the focus
of Chinese fish processing. It is part of China Camp State Park. See China Camp State Park
,
Marin County.
China Cove2 was the location of the United States Immigration Service Station on Angel
Island. B
y 1966, China Cove had been renamed Winslow Cove. See Angel Island, Marin County.
Reference: Teather 1986: 16.

China Point, Marin County.
China Point is a rock promontory that helps define China Cove within China Camp State Park.
See China Cove, Marin County; China Camp State Park, Marin County.

Honoring the Contributions of Chinese Immigrants. Marin County.
There are two markers are on Angel Island in the Angel Island State Park at China Cove. One is a stone slab with Chinese writing. The other is an interpretive monument written in English that commemorate the Chinese immigrants. Reference: Ruppenstein 2013. 

Independence Settlement, Marin County.
The Chinese fishing operation known as the Independence Shrimp Company maintained a
fishing settlement on Point San Pedro b
y 1910. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
James Yeh Jau Liu Plaque. Marin County.
The James Yeh Jau Liu Plaque is located at 34 Main Street, City of Tiburon. It states that Liu was a renown painter who completed over 30,000 paintings. His art sold worldwide to include private collectors and museums. Reference: Swackhamer 2013. 

Mill Valley Chinese Business Area, Marin County.
The Mill Valley Chinese business area, in the town of Mill Valley, was on Blithdale Avenue
between the railroad tracks and Arro
yo Corte Madera del Presidio. By 1903, it had one laundry
and one store. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1903.
Point San Pedro Fishing Village, Marin County.
Point San Pedro Fishing Village may have started as a result of good fishing in the area as well
as a desire to a
void authorities. In any event, discovery of shrimping grounds near the point in
1870 resulted in shrimp becoming the village specialty
. By 1873, the village had 32 houses with
the addition of a school in 1878. However
, at least half of the village burned in 1897 and it was
almost
completely abandoned in 1905 when restrictive legislation on sea bass fishing was
enacted. Ther
e were only ten residents by 1941. Reference: Ma 1991: 29, 38, 40.
Quong Lee Chong Settlement, Marin County.
The Quong Lee Chong Company operated a shrimping settlement on Point San Pedro in 1910.
Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Quong Sing Lung Settlement, Marin County.
A settlement of Chinese shrimp fishermen was operated by the Quang Sing Lung Company at
Point San Pedro in 1910. It was later owned and operated b
y the Quan Brothers and is presently
the site of the China Camp State Park
. See China Camp State Park, Marin County. Reference:
Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62. 
San Rafael Chinatown, Marin County.
San Rafael Chinatown in the town of San Rafael was on the east side of C Street between Third
Street and Fourth Street by 1880
. Increased anti-Chinese activities resulted in there being only
two laundries and four dwellings by 1887. The population decreased again by 1900. However,
a few Chinese business activities continued into the 1950's
. Reference: Ma 1991: 34, 37, 40;
Sanborn Insurance Map 1887a.
Shanghai Valley, Marin County.
Shanghai Valley was the name given to the Chinatown in the community of Sausalito. It was on
the west side of Water Street near Princess Street in 1884
. There were two laundries and by 1900
as many as 15-20 Chinese were living in one of its lodging houses. See Yee Tock Chee City
Park, Marin County. Reference
: Ma 1991: 34, 37; Sanborn Insurance Map 1884d.
Tomales Bay Chinese Settlement, Marin County.
Four Chinese fishermen established a fishing site at Tomales Bay by 1877. They specialized in
abalone. Reference: Ma 1991: 29, 34; Ma 1981: 148.
Union Settlement, Marin County.
The Chinese-owned and operated Union Company maintained a shrimping settlement on Point
San Pedro in 1910. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62
.
Wa Jen Ha Lio, Marin County.
This is the name of the fishing village at China Cove within China Camp State Park as it appears
on one of the commemorative plaques at the site. See China Camp State Park, Marin County
.
Yee Tock Chee City Park, Marin County.
Yee Tock Chee City Park in the town of Sausalito is a small urban park located on the bay side
of Bridge Way at Princess Street
. The park's name is derived from Yee Tock (Willie) Chee who
lived there from 1919 to the 1950's. A respected member of the community, he operated a fruit
store at that location. The park is a memorial to him arid Shanghai Valley
. See Shanghai Valley,
Marin County. Reference: Department of Parks and Recreation 1999; Ma 1991: 40.

Napa County
Berringer Brothers Winery, Napa County.
Chinese participation in the wine industry can be seen in various locations. For example, a
plaque at the Berringer Brothers Winery in Napa indicates that Chinese dug the wine tunnels
between 1876 and 1880. See Buena Vista Winery, Sonoma County; Greystone Winery, Napa
County.
Calistoga Chinese Business Area, Napa County.
The Calistoga Chinese business area in the town of Calistoga was north of the railroad tracks off
Lincoln Avenue in 1886. It had three stores, laundry and several dwellings. However, they were 
gone by 1923. See Sharpsteen Museum, Napa County. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1923
1886a.

China Town, Napa County.
China Town (two words) was located on  First Street, City of Napa. A plaque erected by the Sam Brannan Chapter No. 1004, E. Clampus Vitus states, " Napa’s China Town was situated on both sides of First Street from this point west to Napa Creek. It occupied the area south of First to the Napa River where the Joss House stood near the juncture of Napa Creek and a narrow wagon road. East of the road were several wood framed houses on stilts and the Lai Hing Co. Additional Chinese houses and the Quong Shew Chang Laundry were on the north side of First Street. The area was abandoned in 1929." 

China Slough, Napa County.

This marshy inlet is approximately five miles in length and is parallel to the Napa River where
it reaches San Pablo Bay. Decomposing plants within such a marshy area p
roduce a nutrient-rich,
water-soaked mix of plants and small pieces of rock. In order for the mix to become soil, the
excess water must be removed. Thus, it becomes necessary to build drains, levees and dikes.
Once dried
, the mix is a very productive peat type of soil. However, for agricultural crops to do
well, the peat must be broken into small pieces
. Chinese laborers constructed the elements
required to drain the marsh and broke up the peat
. Over 8,800 acres were reclaimed by them. As
a result, the area become one of the richest food growing regions in California. China Slough
commemorates the effort of those workers. Reference: Cal
ifornia Department of Fish and Game
1969; Chan 1986: 173-187; Gillenkirk and Motlow 1987: 19-20; United Sta
tes Geological Survey 1968.

Greystone Winery, Napa County.

Chinese did much of the construction of the Greystone Winery in St. Helena, completing it in
1889
. They cut the massive stones and dug the tunnels for the wine cellars. Presently known as
the Christian Brothers Winery, it is considered one of the most b
eautiful buildings in California.
Reference: Heintz 1977: 60-61
.

Napa Chinatown, Napa County.

Napa Chinatown in the town of Napa dates to the 1860's. The Sam Brannan Chapter of E.
Clampus Vitus commemorated it by placing a plaque at the site on August 16, 1979. It states,
"Napa's Chinatown was situated on both sides of First Street from this point west to Napa Creek.
It occupied the area south of First Street down to the Napa River where the Joss House stood
near the junction of Napa Creek off a narrow wagon road. East of the road were several
wood
framed houses on stilts and the Lai Hing Company
. Additional Chinese houses and the Quong
Shew Chong Laundry were on the north side of First
. The area was abandoned in 1929." The
altar from the joss house is in the collection of the Chinese Historical Societ
y of America. Many
Chinese residents worked in local vineyards and mines and as laborers building the county's
roads, walls and ditches. Reference: Heintz 1977: 55-77
; Wong 1987: 146-150.

Sam Kee Laundry Building, Napa County.

The building, located in Napa, dates to 1875 when it was a two-story structure. It had been a
laundry operated by Sam Kee and later, a brewer
y and then a saloon. It is on the National
Registry of Historic Places. Reference
: Office of Historic Preservation 1976: 29.

Sharpsteen Museum, Napa County.
Sharpsteen Museum at 1311 Washington Street, City of Calistoga, has dioramas and photo
exhibits of the Chinese in Calistoga and the surrounding area.
St. Helena Chinese Business Area, Napa County.
The Chinese business area of the town of St. Helena was located between Main Street and Pope
Street on both sides of the railroad tracks. By 1886, there were two laundries. Reference:
Sanborn Insurance Map 1886b.
San Francisco County
Betty Ong Chinese Recreation Center, San Francisco County.
Betty Ong Chinese Recreation Center is at 1199 Mason Street, City of San Francisco. Betty Ong was the flight attendant on the first aircraft to be high jacketed on September 11, 2001. She provided important information on the highjackers. The recreation center was named in her honor in 2011. Reference: "Betty Ong." 

Bing Kong Tong Association Building, San Francisco County.
Located at 29 Waverly Place in the City of San Francisco, the building is the meeting place of
the Bing Kong Tong
. The structure dates to 1911. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation
1979a
.
Bo On Tong Building, San Francisco County.
Bo On Tong Building is located at 808 Clay Street, City of San Francisco. It is the headquarters
of a fraternal organization whose membership is limited to those of the Kong Chow
Association.
The structure was built in 1908. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979b.
California Settlement, San Francisco County.
A Chinese shrimping operation known as the California Shrimping Company maintained a
settlement on Hunters Point in 1930. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Cameron House, San Francisco County.
The Presbyterian residence hall for Chinese women at 920 Sacramento Street, City of San
F
rancisco, had as its second superintendent, Donaldina Cameron. In 1942, it was named after her
in recognition of her many years of service. The hall itself dates to 1907
. See Old Culbertson
Hall
, San Francisco, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 164-165.
Cathay American Legion Post No. 384, San Francisco County.
Cathay American Legion Post No. 384 began at 33 Hang Ah Street, City of San Francisco,
during the 1940's. It is now located at 1524 Powell Street, City of San Francisco. The post
continues to offer camaraderie and to provide opportunities for continued service to the
communi
ty, care and protection of veterans, widow and orphans and to support pertinent
legislation
. Reference: American Legion 1999.
Chee Kung Tong Building, San Francisco County.
Located at 36 Spofford Alley, City of San Francisco, the Chee Kung Tong Building was
constr
ucted in 1907. It was the national headquarters from which Sun Yat-sen directed the
Nationalist re
volution for six years. See Wing Sang Mortuary Building, San Francisco County;
Y
utton Hotel, San Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979c.
Chi Sin Buddhist and Taoist Temple. San Francisco County.
The temple is at 1051  Powell Street, City of San Francisco. Founded in 1979, it is a religious place for Buddhists and Taoists, offering support services and ceremonies for the departed. Reference: "Chi Sin Buddhist and Taoist Association."

Children at Play Mural, San Francisco County.
The public art mural is within the Willie "Woo Woo" Wong Playground, 830 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco. It depicts two young children at play. See Willie "Woo Woo" Wong, San Francisco County. Reference: "Willie 'Woo Woo' Wong Playground Improvement Project."  

Chin Wing Chuen Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.
Chin Wing Chuen Benevolent Association Building is located at 811 Clay Street, City of San
Francisco. Built in 1909
, it houses the association for those with the surname of Chin. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1979d.            

China Basin, San Francisco County.

China Basin is on the San Francisco Bay in the City of San Francisco. It was named for the
"China Clippers" of the Pacific Mail Steamship Line that used the port facility. The Pacific Mail
Steamship Line itself was the first such line to be owned by Chinese. The basin had originally
been known as China Flat. See China Basin Street
, San Francisco County; China Flat, San
Francisco Count
y. Reference: Hansen 1975: 114; United States Geological Survey 1956.

China Basin Street, San Francisco County.

China Basin Street runs in a north-to-south manner between China Basin and Central Basin in
the City of San Francisco. It is the only direct access to China Basin
, hence, its name. Of note
is the fact that the street
's name recently changed to that of Terry A. Francois Street. There is a
notation on the new street sign below the new name that simply states, China Basin
. See China
Basin, San Francisco Count
y. Reference: Kurnow 1998. Photo.

China Beach, San Francisco County.

When the Golden Gate National Recreation Area began to consolidate coastal holdings, it
acquired the James Phelan State Park. Upon title transfer from the state to the National Park
System in 1977
, Phelan State Park became known as the China Beach Unit of the National
Recreation Area. In 1981, a granite monument was placed there, bearing the inscription,
"China
Beach. Since Gold Rush times
, this cove was used as a campsite by many of the Chinese
fishermen who worked in and around San Francisco Bay. Their efforts to supply the needs of a
young city helped establish one of the area's most important industries and traditions. Gift of
Henry and Diana Chung famil
y, 1981." Reference: Hunter 1992.

China Flat, San Francisco County.

The Santa Fe Railroad reached Point Richmond in the East Bay during the late 1890's. To move
goods from Richmond to San Francisco
, the railroad needed a terminal facility on both sides of
the East Bay
. On the San Francisco side, the Santa Fe leased a mud flat from the State Board of
Harbor Commissioners. Using mostly Chinese labor, a stone seawall was built around 24 acres
of the mud flat
that was filled with 4 million cubic feet of rock. Slips and railroad yards were
then built on the fill. The facilit
y was known as China Flat. It opened for freight service in 1900.
See China Basin, San Francisco County. Reference: Bryant 1974: 179-80.

Chinatown Commercial Building, San Francisco County.

Chinatown Commercial building at 217 Columbus Avenue, City of San Francisco, is architecturally unique. It was an attempt at a Chinese-like style in the rebuilding of San Francisco
Chinatown after the 1906 earthquake
/fire. Built in 1907, its style was not copied. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 197ge.

Chinatown Gateway, San Francisco County.

Dedicated in May of 1970, Chinatown Gateway is across Grant Avenue at Bush Street, City of
San Francisco. It combines traditional Chinese architecture and modem building materials
. The
Republic of China provided the ceramic tiles. See San Francisco Chinatown
, 'San Francisco

County. Reference: Yip 1985: 347- 349. 
Chinatown Housing for the Elderly, San Francisco County.
Chinatown Housing for the Elderly is in three buildings on Pacific Street ranging from Powell
Street to Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco
. It is a recent effort to alleviate substandard
housing conditions for the elderly of Chinatown
. There are garden terraces on the roof top. See
Ping Yuen Public Housing Project
, San Francisco County; San Francisco Chinatown, San
Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 343-344.
Chinatown Telephone Exchange Building, San Francisco County.
The Chinatown Telephone Exchange dates to the 1890's and employed male operators who spoke
onl
y Chinese. Messengers notified people within San Francisco Chinatown when they had
telephone calls. In 1896, the switchboard and offices moved to 743 Washington Street, City of
San Francisco
. Destroyed in the 1906 earthquake/fire, it was rebuilt at the same location in 1909.
By 1926, it handled 17,000 calls per day, employed female operators, no longer spoke only
Chinese and had long since done away with the messengers
. The building has a distinctive
appearance in that it is a free standing pagoda
. But, it can only be seen from Washington Street.
See San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 209-214.
Chinese American Citizens Alliance National Headquarters, San Francisco County.
Beginning as the Native Sons of the Golden State, a reorganization and new charter changed the
organization's name to the Chinese American Citizen Alliance in 1915
. The Alliance is a political
action body that has been an important element in the struggle for equality
. The headquarters
building, constructed in 1921, is at 1044 Stockton Street
, City of San Francisco. See Walter U.
Lum Place, San Francisco County. Reference: Chung 1998: 95-126; Yip 1985: 287-288.
Chinese American War Memorial. San Francisco County.
Chinese American War Memorial is located  in the center of Saint Mary's Square, 651 California Street, City of San Francisco. The memorial lists the 90 or so Chinese Americans who died in WWI and WWII. reference: English 2013.

Chinese Baptist Church, San Francisco County.
One of the earliest Christian churches in San Francisco Chinatown, the Chinese Baptist Church
dates to 1854. A permanent home for it was built in 1871
. After the 1906 earthquake/fire, the
church was rebuilt in 1908 at 981 Washington Street, City of San Francisco
. See San Francisco
Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 214
-217.
Chinese Central High School, San Francisco County.
This is the current name for Ta Ch'ing Shu-yuan. See Ta Ch'ing Shu-yuan, San Francisco County.
Chinese Chamber of Commerce Building, San Francisco County.
By the late 1880's, the Chinese realized that an overarching organization was needed for the
regulation of business among them. The need was met by the Chinese Chamber of
Commerce, established in 1908
. The facade of its headquarters building, at 728-30 Sacramento
Street, City of San Francisco, became the standard style for subsequent Chinese Chamber of
Commerce buildings throughout California
. Reference: Yip 1985: 249, 252.
Chinese Congregational Church, San Francisco County.
Established in 1870, the Chinese Congregational Church was severely damaged in the 1906
earthquake/fire
. It was reconstructed in 1908 on Walter U. Lum Place, City of San Francisco.
Reference: Yip 1985: 217
.

Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.

Founded before 1862 as the Chinese Six Companies, the association became the central
coordinating body and spokesperson for the Chinese community. The original headquarters
building was destroyed by the 1906 earthquake/fire. By 1908, the association, now known as the
Chinese Benevolent Association, had relocated to 843 Stockton Street, City of San Francisco.
Reference: Chinn 1969: 64- 66; Yip 1985: 183.

Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco, San Francisco County.

Chinese Culture Center is located at 750 Kearny Street, City of San Francisco. It features
photographs of Chinese Americans and Chinese art as well as folk art and crafts. Reference:
California Council 1991: 197.

Chinese Historical Society of America Museum, San Francisco County.

The Chinese Historical Society of America Museum is at 965 Clay Street, City of San
Francisco. The facility contains exhibits, printed material and artifact collections
related to Chinese Americans in the United States with an emphasis on California. It is operated
by the Chinese Historical Society of America.

Chinese Hospital, San Francisco County.

After the destruction of Tung Wah Dispensary in the 1906 earthquake/fire, a major community-
based fund raising effort was launched to rebuild it. This occurred in 1918. The new facility,
named Chinese Hospital and located at 845 Jackson Street, City of San Francisco, was officially
opened on April 18, 1925. See Tung Wah Dispensary, San Francisco, San Francisco County.
Reference: Trauner 1978: 82-86; Yip 1985: 285-287.

Chinese Nationalist Daily Building, San Francisco County.

Located at 809 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco, the building was the home of the
newspaper Chinese National Daily (Kuo Min Yat Po) from 1924 to 1967. The newspaper was
the left wing publication of the Kuomingtang Party of China. See Kuomingtang Building, San
Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979f.

Chinese Penthouse, San Francisco County.

The first Chinese American nightclub in the country was Andy Wong's Chinese Penthouse in
the Grandview Hotel at the corner of Pine Street and Grant Avenue. It opened on December 21,
1937 and changed its name to Chinese Sky Room shortly thereafter. It featured all-Chinese
entertainment. See Forbidden City Nightclub, San Francisco County. Reference: Dong 1992:
126.

Chinese Presbyterian Church Building, San Francisco County.

Chinese Presbyterian Church building is at 925 Stockton Street, City of San Francisco. Although
the church itself was established in 1853, the current structure was built in 1916. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1979g. 

Chinese Primary School, San Francisco County.
Established April 13, 1885 in San Francisco Chinatown at Jackson Street and Powell Street,
Chinese Primary School relocated to Washington Street in 1914. The school resulted from a
California Supreme Court ruling in favor of Chinese children being allowed to attend public
school
. However, its name was changed to Commodore Stockton School in 1924 as a means of
removing what was felt to be a discriminatory name, i.e., Chinese Primary School
. See
Commodore Stockton School, San Francisco County
. Reference: Yip 1985: 166,269.
Chinese Sky Room, San Francisco County.
Chinese Sky Room was a later name for the Chinese Penthouse, the first Chinese American
nightclub. See Chinese Penthouse, San Francisco County.
Chinese Theater Building, San Francisco County.
Chinese Theater building was constructed on Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, in 1852. It
officially opened on December 23. Brought from China, it was reportedly the first Chinese
Theatre to be built in the United States
. Reference: Chinn 1969:72.
Chinese United Methodist Church, San Francisco County.
A Methodist Mission was established in 1870 at 916 Washington Street, City of San Francisco.
It included a chapel, school and home for female orphans and young women rescued from
bondage. Rebuilt after the 1906 earthquake/fire, its main entrance was on Stockton Street
. See
Gum Moon Residence Hall, San Francisco, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 221
.
Chinese Young Man's Christian Association Facilities, San Francisco County.
Community churchmen approved the idea of establishing a Young Man's Christian Association
in 1911. A building at 1028 Stockton Street, City of San Francisco, was dedicated on May 29,
1912. Continued expansion and successful programs prompted a move to 855 Sacramento Street
on February 22, 1926. Reference: Yip 1985: 275-276.
Chinese Young Women's Christian Association Center, San Francisco County.
A Young Woman's Christian Association for Chinese women was first organized in the
community in 1878
. Today's center was designed by Julia Morgan. Its residence club at 940
Powell Street
, City of San Francisco opened August 15, 1932, while the center itself, 965 Clay
Street, City of San Francisco, opened on October 8th of the same year. Presently, the building
is scheduled to become the National Chinese American Museum. See National Chinese
American Museum, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 278-284. Photo.
Chung Sai Yat Po Building, San Francisco County.
Chung Sai Yat Po building, constructed in 1915 at 716 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco,
was the last home of the newspaper, Chung Sai Yat Po. Started by Dr
. Ng Poon Chew, it was the
voice of the Christian community and a supporter of the Nationalist Revolution in China.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979h. 

Chuy Lung Bazaar Building, San Francisco County.
Located at 672 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco, Chuy Lung Bazaar building was
constructed in 1907. It was one of the stores of the oldest known business to have endured from
the Gold Rush to the
Twentieth Century. It went out of business in 1912. Reference: Office of
Historic Preser
vation 1979i.
City Settlement, San Francisco County.
City Settlement was operated by the City Shrimping Company, a Chinese fishing business, on
Hunters Point in 1930
. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Clement Chinatown, San Francisco County.
Clement Chinatown is along Clement Street between Sixth Street and Tenth Street in the City
of San Francisco. About three miles west of San Francisco Chinatown, it is a concentration of
Chinese that was evident by the early 1970's. The settlement resulted from the increased costs of
living in San Francisco Chinatown. See Sunset Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference
:
Minnick 1999.
Commodore Stockton School, San Francisco County.
Commodore Stockton School was built in 1914 on Washington Street, City of San Francisco.
Alice Fong, the first teacher of Chinese ancestry in the city, began her teaching career there in
1926
. See Chinese Primary School, San Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1979j.
Dai Chung Lou, San Francisco County.
Dai Chung Lou, Church of the Big Bell, was actually St. Mary's Cathedral. It had been
constructed using Chinese labor at the comer of today
' s Grant Avenue and California Street, City
of San Francisco, in 1853. The foundation was made of granite that had been quarried in China.
After the earthquake
/fire of 1906, it was razed, reestablished and moved several times, eventually
occupying the comer of Cla
y Street and Stockton Street. It maintained its original Chinese
granite foundation. The church opened on August 1
, 1921 and is often called Sing Ma-li by
today's Chinatown residents
. It is California Historic Landmark No. 810. Reference: Dong n.d.:
2; Yip 1985: 219.
Dai Fow, San Francisco County.
Dai Fow, literally "Big City," is the Chinese name of San Francisco. The term also refers to it
being the first place seen b
y most new immigrants and that the city had the largest Chinese
population in Gum Shan. See San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County.
Dr. Sun Yet Sen 1866-1925 Memorial. San Francisco County.
The memorial is in Saint Mary's Square at 651 California Street, City of San Francisco. The modernistic statue includes a plaque noting that he was the first president of the Chinese Republic. Reference: English 2013.

Eastern Bakery, San Francisco County.
Eastern Bakery is often considered the first in San Francisco Chinatown to serve a complete line
of western baked goods
. It opened in 1923 at its present location, 720 Grant Avenue. Reference:
Yip 1985: 293-296. 
Far East Cafe. San Francisco County.
Far East Cafe is at 631 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco. The building was constructed in 1908. The Far East Cafe has occupied the building since 1920. Reference: Ruppenstein, 2014. 

First Baptist Church. San Francisco County.
First Baptist Church is located at 15 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco. It was founded in 1880 in rental space, moving to its present location in 1888. The building was destroyed by the 1906 earthquake and rebuilt in 1908. Reference: "Discover FCBC."

Fook On Lung Settlement, San Francisco County.
The Fook On Lung Shrimping Company had a shrimping settlement on Hunters Point in 1910.
Reference
: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Forbidden City Nightclub Building, San Francisco County.
The building located at 355 Sutter Street, City of San Francisco, was the home of the famous
Forbidden City Nightclub. It opened on December 22
, 1938, closing in 1962. Coverage of the
night club in the December 9
, 1940 issue of Life magazine gave the place nationwide publicity.
A favorite spot of military servicemen during World War II, its staff and entertainers were
Chinese. An award-winning film documentary about the nightclub by Arthur Dong titled
Forbidden City, US.A. appeared in 1989. See Chinese Penthouse, San Francisco County.
Reference: Dong 1992: 126; Office of Historic Preservation 1978.
Gee Family Association Building, San Francisco County.
Gee Family Association building is on the comer at 101 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco.
However
, it is not designed as a comer structure. Rather, it has one facade on Waverly Place and
another on Clay Street
. The building is the headquarters of the association for those with the
surname of Gee. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979k
.
Gee How Oak Tin Association Building, San Francisco County.
Gee How Oak Tin Association building at 834 Washington Street is the meeting place for those
of the Chan, Woo and Yuan families. The building was constructed in 1920
. Reference: Office
of Historic Preservation 19791
.
George Settlement, San Francisco County.
Chinese shrimp fishermen lived in the settlement owned by the George Company in 1930. It was
on Hunters Point
. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Gold Mountain Historical Marker, San Francisco County.
The marker is in the Embarcadero near Battery Street in the post office area, City of San Francisco. It details the story of early Chinese immigrants in the San Francisco region. Reference: Swackhamer 2013.

Gold Mountain Mural. San Francisco County.
Gold Mountain Mural is on Romolo Place between Fresno Street and Broadway, City of San Francisco. The public art depicts the contributions of the Chinese to American history, to include Betty Ong. See Betty Ong Chinese Recreation Center, San Francisco County. Reference: "Betty Ong." 

Golden Gate Settlement, San Francisco County.
This was a settlement of Chinese shrimp fishermen operated by the Golden Gate Company on
Hunters Point in 1930. Reference: Nash 1973: 5
-1 to 5-62.
Golden West Settlement, San Francisco County.
The Golden West Shrimp Company, Chinese owned and operated, had a settlement on Hunters
Point in 1930. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Gordon J. Lau Elementary School. San Francisco County.
Gordon J. Lau Elementary School is at 950 Clay Street, City of San Francisco. The school was originally founded as a segregated school in 1859. In 1998, it was named in honor of Gordon J. Lau, San Francisco's first Chinese American supervisor. Reference: "Lau (Gordon J.) Elementary School." 

Gum Moon Residence Hall, San Francisco County.
The Chinese United Methodist Church built Gum Moon Residence Hall at 940 Washington
Street, City of San Francisco. Located next to the church and designed b
y Julia Morgan, it was
dedicated on January 27
, 1913 and served as a home for women. See Chinese United Methodist
Church
, San Francisco, San Francisco County. Reference: Choy 1990: 58; Yip 1985: 224.
Haak Seung Gung-hui Building, San Francisco County.
Haak Seung Gung-hui Building was constructed in 1907 at 767 Commercial Street, City of San
Francisco. It is the headquarters of the Sze Yup Merchant Guild. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1979m.

 Hang Ah Street, San Francisco County.
Hang Ah Street is the Chinese name for Pagoda Place. The Hang Ah Tea Room on the street
was the gathering place for members of the Young China Association around 1919 to 1923.
See Kuomingtang Building
, San Francisco County; Pagoda Place, San Francisco County; Wing
Sang Mortuary, San Francisco County. Reference: Lai 1999
.

Hangkow Tassel Company Building, San Francisco County.
Hangkow Tassel Company building at 400 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was built in
1913. It is notable in that it mixes classical and pseudo
-Chinese architectural elements. It also
marks the transition in scale from nearby shopping district structures to the scale of San
Franci
sco Chinatown buildings. Like many buildings in San Francisco Chinatown, its use has
varied through time
. See San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Office of
Historic Preservation 1979n.

Hip Sen Tong Building, San Francisco County.
Hip Sen Tong building at 824 Washington Street, City of San Francisco, was built in 1910.
Commercial use characterizes its first floor with the upper floors housing the Hip Sen Tong.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 19790.

Hip Sing Tong Building, San Francisco County.
Located at 757 Clay Street, City of San Francisco, Hip Sing Tong building was built in 1907. Its
upper floor is the headquarters of the Hip Sing Tong. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation
1979p.

Kong Chow Temple, San Francisco County.
In existence by at least 1857 and possibly as early as 1853, the Kong Chow Temple is owned by
the Kong Chow Association that itself dates to 1851. The temple was destroyed by the
earthquake
/fire of 1906. But, the Kuan Ti (K wan Kung) statue was saved. After moving several
times, the Temple is now at 865 Stockton Street
, City of San Francisco, with the statue properly
displayed. Reference
: Wells 1962: 19-20,22; Yip 1985: 206-209, 366-368.

Kuomingtang Building, San Francisco County.
Kuomingtang building at 830 Stockton Street, City of San Francisco, dates to 1915. It served as
the headquarters of the Kuomingtang Party of the Republic of China
. See Chinese Nationalist
Daily Building, San Francisco County; Hang Ah Street, San Francisco County. Reference: Office
of Historic Preservation 1979q
.

Lee Long Si Tung Building, San Francisco County.
Lee Long Si Tung building at 109 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco, was built in 1907. It
is the meeting place of those with surname of Lee. The organization is for elders and more
formal activities
. See Lee On Dong Association Building, San Francisco County. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1979r.

Lee On Dong Association Building, San Francisco County.
Lee On Dong Association building at 911 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was built in
1919. It houses the association of those with the surname of Lee. The organization is for the 
younger members of the Lee Family Association. See Lee Long Si Tung Building, San Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979s.
Leong Family Association Building, San Francisco County.
Leong Family Association building is at 957 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco. Built in 1907,
it is the headquarters for the Leong Chung How Benevolent Association. The association is for
those
with the surname of Leong. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979t.
Leuong Shui Settlement, San Francisco County.
Chinese shrimp fishermen lived and worked at this settlement that was owned by the Leuong Shui
Compan
y in 1930. The settlement was at Hunters Point. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Lone Mountain Cemetery, San Francisco County.
Lone Mountain Cemetery at California Street and Geary Street, was opened for the Chinese on
Ma
y 30, 1854. It encompassed 160 acres and was renamed Laurel Hill Cemetery in 1867. When
Laurel Hill Ceme
tery was discontinued, the interred were relocated to Cypress Lawn Cemetery,
San Mateo Cou
nty. Today, it is the site of University of San Francisco University, Lone Mountain Campus, 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco. Reference: Chin n.d.(a).
Loong Kong Tien Yee Association Building, San Francisco County.
Loong Kong Tien Yee Association building at 924 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was
buil
t in 1906. It is an organization for those with the surname of Low, Quan, Chang and Chew.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979u.
Low Apartments, San Francisco County.
Low Apartments at 1060 Powell Street, City of San Francisco, was built in 1926 by Mrs. Chew
Fong Lo
w. It is of particular note because at that time, it was extremely unusual for a Chinese
Ameri
can woman to have been so assertive. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979v.
Lum Building, San Francisco County.
Lum building at 953 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was built in 1908. It is the meeting
place for those
with the surname of Lum. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979w.
Mei Lun Chinatown Housing Project, San Francisco County.
Mei Lun Chinatown Housing Project is at Sacramento Street and Stockton Street, City of San
Francisco
. Completed in 1982, it provided low cost housing for the community. Mei Lun features
18
5 units of residential housing, commercial services, meeting facilities and parking. See San
Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 344.
Mission Creek Chinese Fishing Colony, San Francisco County.
Approximately 150 Chinese fishermen established a colony near the mouth of Mission Creek in
1854
. They reportedly caught as much as 3,000 pounds of fish per day. Reference: Chinese
Historical Society of America Museum, 1999.
Nam Kue School, San Francisco County.
Nam Kue School was operated by the Nam Hoy Benevolent Association and opened on March
10,1920. The school moved from its original Jackson Street location to 765 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco, in 1925. The relocation was prompted by increasing enrollment. It was also the site of military training during World War II. The San Francisco Chinatown militia unit known as Company F of the 17th California Infantry used the auditorium of the school as their armory. Reference: Dong n.d.: 1; Dresser 1992: 20-21.
New Shanghai Low Building, San Francisco County.
New Shanghai Low building at 437 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was built in 1922. A
Chinese night club and restaurant, it represents San Francisco Chinatown of the 1920's when it
was seeking new ways of catering to the general population of the city and the tourist trade.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979x.
Ning Kue Association Building, San Francisco County.
Ning Kue Association building at 772 Commercial Street, City of San Francisco, was built in
1908. It is the youth branch of the Ning Yung Association. See Ning Yung Association Building
,
San Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979y.
Ning Yung Association Building, San Francisco County.
Ning Yung Association building located at 41 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco, was
constructed in 1907, being rebuilt at the same location after the 1906 earthquake
/fire. The
association itself dates to 1853. See Ning Kue Association Building
, San Francisco County.
Reference: Choy 1990: 59; Office of Historic Preservation 1979z
.
Old Chinatown Lane, San Francisco County.
See San Francisco Chinatown Street Names: Ma Fong Hong, San Francisco County.
Old Culbertson Hall, San Francisco County.
Presbyterians established a mission within San Francisco Chinatown with the purpose of halting
the trade and bondage of young Chinese women
. The Hall assumed its present location at 920
Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco, by 1881
. The structure was destroyed by the 1906
earthquake/fire and rebuilt in 1907 with Julia Morgan as the designer
. It was named after its first
superintendent
, Margaret Culbertson. See Cameron House, San Francisco, San Francisco County.
Reference: Yip 1985: 229.
Old Shanghai Low Building, San Francisco County.
Old Shanghai Low building located at 522 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was built in
1908
. It is consistent with the trend of pseudo-Chinese architecture that was typical of rebuilding
after the 1906 earthquake
/fire. See Sing Chong Building, San Francisco County; Sing Fat
Building, San Francisco County
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979aa.
Ong Ko Met Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.
Ong Ko Met Benevolent Association building at 717 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was
built in 1907
. The building houses the association for those with the surname of Ong. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1979bb.
Pagoda Place, San Francisco County.
Incised into the sidewalk along Pagoda Place is the following: "Pagoda Alley is the western name
for this alley way. Hang Ah means fragrance in Chinese. Starting in the late 1840's, early Chinese
settlers introduced their own alley names. Pagoda Alley became Hang Ah or Fragrance Alley
when a German chemist opened a perfumery." See Hang Ah Street, San Francisco County
; San
Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County
.
Parrott Granite Block, San Francisco County.
The Parrott Block is notable for at least two reasons. First, it was constructed by Chinese laborers
in 1852. Second
, it was made of granite blocks quarried and shipped from China specifically for
the construction of the building. The 1906 earthquake/fire did little damage to it
. Today, the
Financial Center Building, City of San Francisco, located on the northwest comer of California
Street and Montgomery Street, stands where the Parrot Granite Block was located. The site is
California Historical Landmark No
. 89. Reference: California Department of Parks and
Recreation, 1981
.
Peking Bazaar Company Building, San Francisco County.
Peking Bazaar Company building at 450 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was constructed
in 1921. It closely followed the architectural style of the Sing Chong building and Sing Fat
building. However, it does have a pagoda
-like tower. See Sing Chong Building, San Francisco
County; Sing Fat Building, San Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation
1979cc
.
Ping Yuen Public Housing Project, San Francisco County.
Located on Pacific Street, City of San Francisco, Ping Yuen Public Housing Project was the first
large scale attempt to provide low cost housing within the San Francisco Chinatown. Construc-
tion began in the early 1950s: Tung Ping Yuen (East Tranquil Garden), Chung Ping Yuen(Central
Tranquil Garden) and Sai Ping Yuen (West Tranquil Garden). An annex, Buk Ping Yuen (North
Tranquil Garden) was dedicated November 5, 1958. Combined, there are over 430 units. See San
Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Nee and Nee 1973: 320-337; Yip 1985:
312-314.
Portsmouth Square, San Francisco County.
Known as Portsmouth Square, the urban park between Kearny Street and Clay Street and Wash-
ington Street and Walter U. Lum Place, City of San Francisco, has long been a focal point for the
community
. It was revamped in the 1960's to that of a split level park with underground parking.
See San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Yip 1985: 320.

Quong Duck Settlement, San Francisco County.
The Quong Duck Settlement was on Hunters Point. It was the home and place of work for
Ch
inese shrimp fishermen employed by the Quong Duck Company. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1
to 5-62.

Quong Fat Settlement, San Francisco County.
Chinese Shrimp fishermen lived and worked at the Hunter Point settlement owned by the Quong
Fat Shrimp Company in 1930
. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.

Quong Lee Chong Settlement, San Francisco County.
This Hunter Point fishing settlement was named after the Chinese shrimp company, Quong Lee
Chong. The company operated out of it in 1910
. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.

Quong Sang Settlement, San Francisco County.
Quong Sang Settlement was the site for Chinese shrimp fishermen at Hunters Point in 1930.
Reference
: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.

Rincon Point Chinese Fishing Village, San Francisco County.
By 1853, a sizable Chinese fishing village had developed on the south side of Rincon Point
directly under the present-day Bay Bridge on the San Francisco side. Reportedly, there were
approximately 150 Chinese and 25 boats
. All were gone by 1865. Reference: Ma 1981: 142.

Sam Yup Benevolent Association Headquarters, San Francisco County.
The Sam Yup Benevolent Association, originally known as the Canton Company, was established
in 1850. Thus
, it is one of the earliest of the district associations that sought to provide for its
fellow immigrants. By 1854
, the name had changed to its present form. The Association continues
to work for equalit
y as part of the Chinese Benevolent Association. The headquarters is at 831-43
Grant Avenue
, City of San Francisco. See Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association
Building
, San Francisco County. Reference: Dong n.d.: 3.

San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County.
San Francisco Chinatown, City of San Francisco, was identifiable as early as 1852-54. Known
as Dai Fow--the Big Cit
y--from its beginning, its importance as the economic, political and civic
center fo
r the Chinese throughout the state cannot be overestimated. The 1906 earthquake/fire
destroyed much of the community. Quickly rebuilt
, it took on the Chinese-like architectural
appearance seen toda
y. See San Francisco Chinatown Street Names, San Francisco County; San
Francisco Streetscape Structures,
San Francisco County; Sing Chong Building, San Francisco
County
; Temples of San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County. Reference: Dong n.d.: 2;
Yip 1985
: 85; United States Geological Survey 1956a.

San Francisco Chinatown Street Names, San Francisco County.
Although the streets of San Francisco Chinatown, City of San Francisco, have official
Euro American place names
, the people of Chinatown and the Chinatown Telephone Company, a
branch of the Pacific Telephone Company, often use other names such as the following: 
     Bock Wah Jeun Gai. The Street of Plain Language John, as it is translated, identifies
     today's Beckett Street
. The Chinese placename was derived from anon-Chinese man who
     spoke fluent Cantonese and acted as interpreter for members of Chinatown. John could
     most often be found on Beckett Street rather than in his office.
     Fah Yuan Gok. This street on the west side of Portsmouth Square translates as Comer
     of the Flower Garden. Once known as Brennan Place, it is now Walter U. Lum Place.
     Foh Sill Hong. Long-time residents of Chinatown might recognize this placename as
     Alley of Burning Fire. Today, most know it as St
. Louis Alley.
     Guih Luih- Tung Hong. Established after the store on Spofford Alley, an export-import
     business on the alley lent its name to Ross Alley.
     Gum Gook Yook. To those unfamiliar with the Chinese placename, it means Lane of the
     Golden Chrysanthemums. Many know it simply as Jason Court.
     Ma Fong Hong. Through the years this short street has been identified by many names.
     Its current official designation is Old Chinatown Lane but the people of the area have
     always called it Horse Stable Alley, as indicated in the 1926 telephone directory.
     T'ang Yen Gai. Meaning the Street of the Men of T'ang, it identifies Sacramento Street,
     the first street upon which new immigrants stood.
     T'ien Hou Miao Gai. The Street of the Empress of Heaven Temple derives its name from
     the temple at the top of the Shew Hing Association building. The sign on the street
     comer reads Waverly Place.
     Tin Luih- Tung Hong. This short and narrow street, named after a store specializing in
     exporting and importing goods to and from the Philippines and Mexico, is Spofford
     Alley
.
     Tuck Wo Gai. The Street of Virtue and Harmony is actually present-day Wentworth
Place.
Reference: Dong and Horn 1980: 24-27; Hoy 1943: 71-75.
San Francisco Chinatown Streetscape Structures, San Francisco County.
Eight structures of San Francisco Chinatown have been placed within California's Historic Re-
source Inventory as elements that help give San Francisco Chinatown its distinctive streetscape.
Built between 1906 and 1911, they display post-1906 earthquake/fire architecture.

685 Commercial Street 
731 Commercial Street
751 Commercial Street
654 Grant Avenue


901 Grant Avenue
918 Grant Avenue
820 Clay Street
531 Jackson Street

A continuous streetscape view can be seen along Waverly Street. Reference: Choy 1990: 54Office of Historic Preservation 1979dd.
See Hop Wo Settlement, San Francisco County.
See Hop Wo Settlement was on Hunters Point. It was a Chinese shrimp fishing operation in
1930. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.
Sing Chong Building, San Francisco County.
Constructed after the 1906 earthquake/fire at 601 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, the Sing
Chong building represents an attempt to make Chinatown the
"oriental bazaar" of San Francisco.
The effort was a reaction to the city's interest in relocating San Francisco Chinatown to Hunters
Point
. Sing Chong building is one of two such architectural statements. See San Francisco
Chinatown, San Francisco Count
y; Sing Fat Company Building, San Francisco County.
Reference: Dong n
.d.: 1-2.
Sing Fat Company Building, San Francisco County.
Established in 1866, Sing Fat Company was one of the first to offer Chinese art objects and
antiques in the United States
. After the earthquake/fire of 1906, it was rebuilt at 717 California
Street, City of San Francisco. Its distincti
ve and trend setting architectural style, one of two such
buildings, helped launch San Francisco Chinatown as a shopping area. See San Francisco
Chinatown
, San Francisco County; Sing Chong Building, San Francisco County. Reference:
Choy 1990: 49; Dong n.d.: l.
Sing Kee Store, San Francisco County.
Sing Kee Store was located at 808 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco. After the 1906
earthquake/fire, a re-designation of addresses caused its address to become 756 Sacramento
Street
. The store was owned by Lung Chin, a Heungshan merchant who became known as the
Potato King because of his extensive farm land in California and Oregon. The
Alien Land Act
of 1920 and the 1923 amendment prompted the closure of the farms. See Shin Kee Tract
, San
Joaquin Count
y. Reference: Lai 1998: 5.
Sing Ma-li, San Francisco County.
This is a recent name for Dai Chung Lou. See Dai Chung Lou, San Francisco County.
Soo Yuen Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.
Soo Yuen Benevolent Association building at 801 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was
completed in 1922. Its appearance represents the emerging 1920's architectural style. The
association is for those of the Louie
, Fong and Kwong families. See San Francisco Chinatown
Streetscape Structures
, San Francisco County. Reference: Choy 1990: 54; Office of Historic
Preservation 197gee.
Sue Hing Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.
Sue Hing Benevolent Association building at 125-29 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco,
houses the association of those from the Sze Yup District
. See T'ien How Temple, San
Francisco Count
y. Reference: Dong n.d.: 4.

Suey Sing Tong Building, San Francisco County.
Suey Sing Tong building at 915 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was constructed in 1907.
The tong's headquarters is on the upper floor with the lower floors given over to commercial
activity. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979ff.
Sunset Chinatown, San Francisco County.
The Chinese community known as Sunset Chinatown centers on Sunset Boulevard south of the
Golden Gate Park, City of San Francisco. It became identifiable as more Chinese relocated away
from the San Francisco Chinatown during the 1970's. The reason for the move pertained to
increased costs in housing and commercial rents. Joined by recent Asian immigrants in an area
of predominately non-Chinese, it represents a contemporary suburban Chinatown. Reference:
Yip 1985: 369-370.
Ta Ch'ing Shu-yuan, San Francisco County.
The first community-operated Chinese school in City of San Francisco, the Ta Ch'ing Shu-yuan
was established in 1884. It was given the upper floor of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent
Association building in San Francisco Chinatown after the earthquake/fire of 1906. Today, the
Chinese Central High School at 827 Stockton Street is the direct descendant ofTa Ch'ing Shu-
yuan. Reference: Chinn 1969: 68.
Taiwan Pavilion, San Francisco County.
Taiwan Pavilion is on Strawberry Hill in Stow Lake within Golden Gate Park, City of San
Francisco. Materials and the artisans who built it came from the Republic of China. Members
of the Chinese community are very active in its maintenance. Reference: Coates 1998; Fung,
Sun-yiu et
. al. 1987: 317.
Temples of San Francisco Chinatown, San Francisco County.
San Francisco Chinatown has been the site of many temples. The following notations about the
temples retain the spellings as given in the literature. Common spellings are given in parentheses
.
     Temple of Ah Ching. The temple was at what is now the comer of Mason Street and Post
     Street
. It was in use until at least 1868. Ah Ching was the person who established the
     temple.
     Temple of All Gods. This was another name for the Temple of Ah Ching.
     Temple of Ch'eng Huang. Located on Waverly Street, it honored the deity that was the
     spiritual official of a city.
     Temple of Eastern Glory. Found on Waverly Place, the temple's focus was the God of
     Fire.
     Temple of the God of the North and the Azure Heavens. It was located on Waverly Place.
     Temple of the Holy AbbotIt was located on Stockton Street. 

     Temple of Kuan Kung (Kwan Kung). Its address was 933 Dupont Street (today's Grant 
     Avenue) and centered on the God of Civic Virtue and Literature. It was owned by the
     Hakka Company. It was in existence in 1892.

     Temple of Kuan Kung (Kwan Kung). Found at 751 Clay Street, the temple was owned
     by the Hop Woh Company and was still in operation in 1892.

     Temple of Kuan Yin. At the comer of Spofford Alley and Washington Street, the temple
     was devoted to Kuan Yin
, Goddess of Mercy, and was there until 1892.

     Temple of Kum Foh (Kum Fah). Located on Brooklyn Place near Sacramento Street, it
     featured a deity that was the Goddess of Women and Children
.

     Temple of Kwan Kung. Located on the west side of Waverly Place between Clay Street
     and Sacramento Street
, it was owned by the Sze Yup Company in the late 1800s. The
     deity is the God of Literature and Valor as well as peace and war.

     Temple of Lung Gong (K wan Kung). The temple contained images of Lan Pey (Liu Pei).

     Temple of the Tam Clan. The temple's location was on Oneida Place and pertained to
     clan patriarch, Tam. It was in operation until at least 1892.

     Temple of T'ien Hou. Located at 125 Waverly Place, the temple may date to 1852. The
      building was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake/fire and was rebuilt and contained the
      original statue and temple bell
. The deity was the Queen of Heaven.

     Temple of the Yeung Woh Company. The temple was on Sacramento Street below
     Dupont Street (Grant Avenue today) and was devoted to How Wong, a deity of people
     from the Heungshan District
. The temple was there at least until 1892.

Reference: Wells 1962: 24-30.

The Chinese World Building, San Francisco County.

The Chinese World building at 736 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was built in 1907. The
Chinese World,
a newspaper also known as Man Ring Bo, moved into it during 1917, suspending
operation in 1969. The newspaper was printed in English and Chinese and focused on the China
Reform Movement
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979gg.

Tranquil Garden Housing Project, San Francisco County.
See Ping Yuen Housing Project
, San Francisco County.

Tung Wah Dispensary, San Francisco County.

Being barred from using the county hospital during the 1860's and 1870's, the Chinese relied upon
herbalists and traditional medical practices offered by the Six Companies. Thus, it was not until

1900 that Western-style medical practices were available to the community. This was made 
possible by the Tung Wah Dispensary that opened its doors at 828 Sacramento Street, City of 
San Francisco. Destroyed by the 1906 earthquake/fire, Tung Wah Dispensary reemerged as
Chinese Hosp
ital. See Chinese Hospital, San Francisco, San Francisco County. Reference:
Trauner 1978: 82-86; Yip 1985: 285-287.

Union Settlement, San Francisco County.
The Union Settlement on Hunters Point, a place of Chinese shrimping activity, was operated by
t
he Union Company in 1910. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.

Walter U. Lum Place, San Francisco County.
Walter U. Lum was a first generation Chinese American born and raised in San Francisco
Chinatown
. Through the years he worked to achieve an equal status for Chinese Americans. He
h
elped establish and then served fifteen times as the president of the Chinese American Citizens
A
lliance. Moreover, he founded and managed The Chinese Times, a Chinese language newspaper
read th
roughout the United States. He actively fought United States immigration practices and
laws that discriminated against the Chinese. In 1985
, 24 years after his death, the City Council
of the City of San Francisco voted to change the name of B
renham Place in San Francisco
Chinatown to Walter U
. Lum Place in recognition of his lifelong efforts. Reference: Lew 1978:
1-3; L
ew 1977: 2- 4Photo.

Willie "Woo Woo" Wong Playground, San Francisco County.
The playground is at 830 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco. Wong was a renown basketball player in the 1940's and was the first Chinese American to play Madison Square Garden. The Chinese playground, where he had played as a child, was renamed in recognition of his athletic abilities.  Reference: "Willie 'Woo Woo' Wong."  

Wing Hing Wo Settlement, San Francisco County.
Wing Hing Wo was a Chinese settlement on Hunters Point that was involved with shrimp fishing in 1930.
Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.

Wing Sang Mortuary Building, San Francisco County.
Wing Sang Mortuary building at 17 Walter U. Lum Place, City of San Francisco, was built in
1913. In addition to housing a mortuary that ser
ved San Francisco Chinatown, it was the
headq
uarters of the Young China Association, a group who supported Dr. Sun Yat-sen. Under
Dr
. Sun's instruction, its newsletter became the daily newspaper, The Young China. Dr. Sun is
said to
have sought refuge at the building on one of his visits to the United States. See Chee
K
ung Tong Building, San Francisco County; Hang Ah Street, San Francisco County; Yutton
Hotel, San Francisco County. Reference
: Office of Historic Preservation 1979hh

Woh Hei Yuen Park, San Francisco County.
Woh Hei Yuen Park is at Powell Street and John Street, City of San Francisco. Originally known as Chinatown New Park, its name was changed to Woh Hei Yuen Park in 2012. Its current name means Garden of Peace. Reference: Alexander. Photo. 

Wong Family Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.

Wong Family Benevolent Association building at 37 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco, was
built in 1911
. Association members are those with the surname of Wong. Reference: Office of
Historic Preservation 1979ii
.

Yan Wo Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.

Yan Wo Benevolent Association building at 945 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco, was
constructed in 1908
. It is the headquarters of the Yan Wo Benevolent Association that was
established in 1852 as the Sun
-on Company. The association members are Hakka from the
districts of Pao
-on and Hui Yang. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979jj.

Yee Family Association Building, San Francisco County.

Yee Family Association building at 131 Waverly Place, City of San Francisco, was built in 1907.
It is the headquarters for those ~ith the surname of Yee. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1979kk.

Yeong Wo Benevolent Association Building, San Francisco County.

Yeong Wo Benevolent Association building at 746 Sacramento Street, City of San Francisco,
was built in 1928. The association
, established in 1852, was for those from the districts of
He
ungshan, Tsengshing, Tungkun and Poklo. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 197911.

Yick Wo Elementary School, San Francisco County.

The elementary school at 2245 Jones Street in San Francisco Chinatown was originally the Sarah
B
. Cooper Elementary School. It was renamed in honor of Yick Wo, a laundryman who
challenged restrictive legislation directed toward the Chinese of San Francisco. The Supreme
Court of the United States ruled in his favor in 1886; thereby, helping to establish equal
protection under the law for the Chinese
.

Ying On Merchants and Labor Association Building, San Francisco County.

Ying On Merchants and Labor Association building at 745 Grant Avenue, City of San Francisco,
was built in 1906. The building runs through a block, having a facade that faces on Grant Avenue
and Waverly Place. The Grant Avenue facade is the more ornate of the two
. Reference: Office
of Historic Preservation 1979mm.

Yip Fook Settlement, San Francisco County.
A Chinese shrimp fishing settlement, operated by the Yip Fook Company, was on Hunters Point
in 1930. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-1 to 5-62.

Yutton Hotel, San Francisco County.

The original Yutton Hotel at 839 Clay Street, City of San Francisco, was destroyed in the 1906
earthquake
/fire. It was rebuilt at the same location in 1908. Dr. Sun Yat -sen stayed at the hotel
in 1896 and again in 1910
. See Chee Kung Tong Building, San Francisco County; Wing Sang
Mortuary Building
, San Francisco County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979nn.

San Mateo County
Bai Ling Section, Skylawn Memorial Park, San Mateo County.
Bai Ling (one hundred years of longevity) section is within Skylawn Memorial Park, City of San
Mateo
. It is for those who wish to maximize burial site feng shui. Reference: Crowder 1999: 34.
California Shrimp Company Camp, San Mateo County.
See Fook On Lung Camp, San Mateo County.
China Field, San Mateo County.
China Field is above Honsinger Creek on the east side, about one mile north of where the creek
joins Pescadero Creek near Pescadero Road. It
was a flat area cleared by the Chinese for farming
in the 1870's. Reference: Brown 1975: 18.    .
China Flat, San Mateo County.
China Flat is the name given to China Field on a United States Geological Survey map dated
1955
. See China Field, San Mateo County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1961.
China Grade, San Mateo County.
Chinese laborers built the road known as China Grade in 1887. It is on the east side of Peters
Creek in Portola State Park
. Reference: Brown 1975: 18.
China Gulch, San Mateo County.
(1) The Chinese who built McKinley Sawmill in 1882 lived in China Gulch. It is along Gazos
Creek below Sa
ndy Point. See China Opening, San Mateo County. Reference: Brown 1975: 18.
(2) China Gulch is on the o
cean shoreline about one-third of a mile south of Whitehouse Creek.
Chinese lived there from the early 1900's to the 1950's. Reference: Brown 1975: 19.
China Opening, San Mateo County.
China Opening is on the north side of Gazos Creek Road about one mile beyond Sandy Point.
The placename is thought to have resulted from a clearing made by Chinese who lived in nearby
Ch
ina Gulch in the early 1880's and farmed there. See China Gulch (1), San Mateo County.
R
eference: Brown 1975: 18.
China Slough, San Mateo County.
Chinese clam fishermen had a camp along the slough in the l880's. The name apparently is
derived from their presence on the sloug
h. Reference: Brown 1975: 19.
Chinese Cemetery, San Mateo County.
The cemetery noted as Chinese Cemetery on United States Geological Survey topographic maps
is actuall
y Look San Cemetery. See Look San Cemetery, San Mateo County. Reference: United
States Geological Survey 1956
.



Chinese Cemetery Road, San Mateo County.
The road, between Junipero Sierra and Skyline Boulevard, was constructed in 1877 and was
originally called San Pedro Road
. When a Chinese cemetery was established at its end, the name
appears to have changed to Chinese Cemetery Road. Reference: Brown 1975
: 19.

Chinese Christian Cemetery, San Mateo County.
This cemetery is next to Ning Yung Cemetery in Daley City. It is open to all Christian faiths.

Chinese Six Companies Cemetery, San Mateo County.
Chinese Six Companies Cemetery is known as Look San Cemetery. See Look San Cemetery, San
Mateo County.

Chinese Walls, San Mateo County.
Chinese Walls are within Wunderlich County Park, Woodside Road (Highway 84), City of Woodside. A plaque was installed there by Friends of the Wall and the Chinese Historical Society of America in 2008. It commemorates the Chinese who, in 1872, built the dry stack walls using stones removed from land clearance. Reference: Swackhamer 2013. 

Easton Chinese Fishing Village, San Mateo County.
Easton Chinese Fishing Village was located on the San Francisco Bay near present-day Easton
Drive and El Camino Real
, City of Burlingame. About 10 shrimp fishermen worked there in
1880
. The village persisted until at least 1894. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980b.

Fook On Lung Camp, San Mateo County.
Fook On Lung Camp was a shrimping operation on the south side of Point San Bruno. It was run
by the Fook On Lung Company in 1910. Later, it was purchased by the California Shrimp
Company. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-11
.

Golden Hill Memorial Park, San Mateo County.
Golden Hill Memorial Park at 2099 Hillside Boulevard in Colma was developed in 1993. Feng
shui was an important element in its design
. It is open to all Chinese. Reference: Chin n.d. (b).

Hoy Sun Ning Yung Cemetery, San Mateo County.
Hoy Sun Ning Yung Cemetery is next to Golden Hill Cemetery in the town of Colma. The cemetery is
actually the second Cemetery. It was established in 1987 when the original Hoy Sun Ning Yung
Cemetery filled to capacit
y. See Ning Yung Cemetery, San Mateo County. Reference: Chin
n.d.(c); Crowder 1999: 34
.

Look San Cemetery, San Mateo County.
Look San Cemetery, noted as Chinese Cemetery on United States Geological Survey topographic
maps
, is located at Gellert Boulevard and Hickey Boulevard in Daly City. Dating to 1889, it has
been operated by the Chinese Six Companies Cemetery Association. Plots within the cemeter
y
are divided into sections according to district. See Chinese Cemetery Road, San Mateo County;
Lone Mountain Cemetery
, San Francisco County. Reference: Brown 1975: 19; Crowder 1999:
34; United States Geological Survey 1956; Louie 1998.

Menlo Park Chinatown, San Mateo County.
The businesses of Menlo Park Chinatown, City of Menlo Park, were mostly owned by
Heungshanese. The small China
town lasted until the 1950's. Reference: Lai 1998: 7. 

Nettie Wan, San Mateo County.
Nettie Wan was the Chinese name for a pool of water in San Mateo Creek. The place name is
thought to be a pidgin English form of "net" followed by the Cantonese word for pond or small
body of water
. Chinese fishermen washed their nets in the pool. Reference: Brown 1964: 175.
Ning Yung Cemetery, San Mateo County.
Located at Junipero Sierra Boulevard and Hickey Boulevard in Daly City, It is also known as Hoy Sun Ning Yung Cemetery. It is for people with Toishan affiliation. Reference: Crowder 1999: 34;
Louie 1998.
Sak Wong Ty Camp, San Mateo County.
The Chinese shrimp fishing camp known as Sak Wong Ty Camp on San Mateo Point was
established in 1893
. It was operated by the Sak Wong Ty Company. Reference: Nash 1973: 5-61.
San Mateo Chinatown, San Mateo County.
Dating to the 1870's, San Mateo Chinatown was centered on B Avenue and Second Avenue in
the City of San Mateo
. It appears to have been a service center for the one dozen or so Chinese- 
owned flower growing nurseries located between 25th Avenue and 33rd Avenue at today's College
of San Mateo and around the golf course along Highway 92 beyond Hillsdale. Reference: Lai
1998: 7,9; Sanborn Insurance Map 1888d.
San Mateo Chinese Business Area, San Mateo County.
San Mateo Chinese business area was located at First Avenue and Claremont Street. Its focus
was the Hop Yick store by the turn of the century. It disappeared before World War II
.
Reference: Lai 1998: 7.

Tung Sen Cemetery, San Mateo County.
Tung Sen Cemetery is located near Imperial Way and Hickey Boulevard, Daley City. It is owned by the Tung Sen Association and is for those who were from the Loong Du villages of China. Reference: "Tung Sen Cemetery." 

Santa Clara County
Ah Toy Alley, Santa Clara County.
Ah Toy Alley was located in San Jose Chinatown. On May 4, 1887, a fire started in the alley. It
was presumably set by an arsonist
. The fire swept through San Jose Chinatown, destroying most
of the buildings. See San Jose Chinatown, Santa Clara County
. Reference: Yu 1991: 29.
Alviso Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Most of the Chinese residents of Alviso Chinatown worked at the Bay Side Canning Company.
See Bay Side Canning C
ompany, Santa Clara County.
Bay Side Canning Company, Santa Clara County.
Bay Side Canning Company was owned and operated by Sai Yin Chew. The company was
originally known as Precita Canning Company, a major canner of fruits and vegetables. Started
in 1890 in San Francisco, the plant was destroyed by the earthquake/fire of 1906. Shortly after
that, it was reconstructed in the town of Alviso under the name Bay Side Canning Company
.
Most of the buildings were located around Elizabeth Street and Hope Street. Chew's son, Thomas
Foon Chew, Chinese American, joined the firm and expanded the cannery to include plants in 
Isleton and Mayfield. The operation provided jobs to hundreds of Chinese. See China Camp

Santa Clara County. Reference: Wright 1971: 20-44; Wey 1988: 127; Yu 1991: 103.

Big Jim's Chinatown, Santa Clara County.

Chin Shin or Big Jim, as he was known by non-Chinese, essentially ran the Chinatown called
Phillipsville, City of San Jose. This occurred because he built a cannery nearby and employed
local Chinese. Thus
, Big Jim's Chinatown was simply another name for Phillipsville. The appeal
of Heinlen ville over Big Jim's Chinatown and Shin's return to China in 1902 marked its end. See
Heinlenville, Santa Clara County; Phillipsville, Santa Clara County. Reference: Yu 1991: 36,43.

China Camp, Santa Clara County.

China Camp, town of Alviso, was a two-story bunkhouse on the northeast comer of Hope Street
and Elizabeth Street. It was the residential quarters for some of the employees of the Bay Side
Cannery. See Bay Side Cannery, Santa Clara County. Reference: Wright 1971
: 20-44.

Chinese Camp, Santa Clara County.

In the 1850's, China was a major consumer of quicksilver, receiving almost 50 percent of the
New Almaden Quicksilver Mine
's production. The importance of the mine was made clear when
an emissary from China visited there, causing a prefabricated pagoda to be erected at the mine
by the mid 1850's. In the 1870's, there were as many as 50 Chinese at the mine. The
y worked as
cooks
, laborers and as miners, living in a camp next to the main mine shaft. The Chinese were
gone by the 1880's. The pagoda was dismantled in 1928. See New Almaden Mining Museum
,
Santa Clara County. Reference : Neilson 1971: 198-217.

Cleveland Avenue Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
This was an additional name for Heinlenville in San Jose. See Heinlenville, Santa Clara County.

Doy Say Tong Yun Fow, Santa Clara County.
Doy Say Tong Yun Fow was the Chinese name for Heinlenville in San Jose. See Heinlenville,
Santa Clara County.

Gilroy Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Gilroy Chinatown was a small Chinese community within the town of Gilroy. The Chinese
worked mostly in fruit cultivation. Reference: Yu 1991: 19.

Gilroy Historical Museum, Santa Clara County.
Gilroy Historical Museum at 195 Fifth Street, City of Gilroy, has a permanent exhibit on the
Chinese when the city was noted for its tobacco industry.

Heinlenville, Santa Clara County.

Most of the buildings of the original San Jose Chinatown were destroyed by fire in 1887. The
Chinese quickly discovered that they could not rebuild on the site
, so a new location was sought.
On June 20, 1887
, John Heinlen leased property at Sixth Street and Taylor Street to eleven
Chinese for their use and occupation. Heinlen build the necessary buildings
. The area, bounded
by Fifth, Seventh, Jackson and Taylor Street became known as Heinlenville. It was soon the 
center for the Chinese throughout Santa Clara County and was called Doy Say Tong Yun Fow. Of note was the fact that Heinlenville was surrounded by a high fence, topped with barbed wire. The purpose of the fence was to keep non-Chinese out, particularly during Chinese celebrationsBy the 1930s, Heinlenville came to an end. The Great Depression and bankruptcy of the John Heinlen Company were the principal factors. Yet, Da Jui (All Soul's Day), as decreed by T'ien Hou, the principal deity of the Heinlenville temple, is still celebrated in the City of San Jose. It is now known as the Summer Festival. See Ken Ying Low Restaurant, Santa Clara County. Reference: Chan 1994: 28; Yu 1991: 31-41,107-108.
Ken Ying Low Restaurant Building, Santa Clara County.
The Ken Ying Low Restaurant building is the best preserved of the remaining three buildings
of San Jose Chinatown that was centered on Market Street and San Fernando Street
. Operated
by the Ng family
, its reputation for fine food attracted patrons from as far away as Sacramento
and San Francisco
. See San Jose Chinatown, Santa Clara County. Reference: Yu 1991: 65.
Los Gatos Chinese Business Area, Santa Clara County.
The Los Gatos Chinese business area was located in the town of Los Gatos on the south side of
Railroad A venue and south of Main Street across from the railroad tracks. There was a laundry
and two dwellings in February 1891. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1891 b.
Los Gatos Stone Walls, Santa Clara County.
Built by Chinese laborers, the stone walls are made of dry stacked field stones. Ranging in
thickness from one and one-half feet to three feet, they originally marked the boundaries of
ranches in the area. By 1980, more than two miles remained along Kennedy Road east of Los
Gatos Boulevard in the City of Los Gatos. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980c.
Market Street Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Market Street Chinatown is another name for San Jose Chinatown. The alternate name comes
from its location on Market Street, one of its borders. See San Jose Chinatown, Santa Clara
County.
Maryknoll Seminary, Santa Clara County.
Maryknoll's long-term missionary activity in China manifested itself in the seminary built in
Cupertino in 1926. San Francisco architect, Howard Milton and others designed the facility. The
building, known as the Drum Tower, clearly reveals the classical Chinese architecture, a
style that began in the Tang Dynasty. The tower's scroll work indicates the South China
influence. The seminary became a retirement home in 1969. Reference: Cooper 1971: 106-125.
Mayfield Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Mayfield Chinatown, south of the City of Palo Alto, consisted mostly of Heungshanese. A small
Chinatown, it was gone by world War II
. Reference: Lai 1998: 8.
Ming Quong Children's Center, Santa Clara County.
By the 1950's, Chinese children were being easily placed in foster homes. As a result, the need
for Ming Quong orphanage decreased. Thus, the orphanage evolved into a facility open to boys  and girls of all ethnic backgrounds and specialized in residential treatment of emotionally 
disturbed children. Reference: Wong 1971: 176-195.

Mountain View Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Mountain View Chinatown in the community of Mountain View was particularly notable
because of its mobilit
y. It was originally located along the stage coach route that connected San Francisco and San Jose. Once the railroad came through the area, Chinatown relocated next to the rail tracks. Reference: Liu 1987: 15.

National Dollar Store, Santa Clara County.
Starting in San Jose, Joe Shoong owned a shirt manufacturing business. It failed but he went on to establish the National Dollar Store chain of retail outlets. The store in San Jose was on First Street and sold mostly clothing. It, like the others throughout the state, provided employment to many Chinese during the difficult times of the 1920's and 1930's. Shoong was a philanthropist who made many contributions to Chinese schools. See Joe Shoong House, Alameda County. Reference: Leung 1984: 67; Yu 1991: 103.

New Almaden Mining Museum, Santa Clara County.
New Almaden Mining Museum, in the town of New Almaden, maintains artifacts from the
Chinese Camp pagoda: pillars
, a carved panel and bell. See Chinese Camp, Santa Clara County.

Ng Shing Gung, Santa Clara County.
Ng Shing Gung means Temple of the Five Gods. In 1888, the two-story brick temple was at
Cleveland S
treet and Taylor Street in Heinlenville. The first floor of the temple served as a
meeting hall
, school and cultural center with the temple on the second floor. There one found Kwan Yin, Goddess of Mercy; Tien Ho (T'ien Hou) Queen of Heaven and Kwan Gung (Kwan Kung), God of War and Justice. The other two deities were most likely Choi Sun, God of Wealth and Wah Tao, God of Medicine. Dismantling of the temple began in 1949 and its furnishings were preserved by the City of San Jose. Today's replica exhibit building, known as Ng Shing Gung Museum, was dedicated during ceremonies on September 28-29, 1991. The museum displays temple artifacts, interprets the story of the Chinese in the area and provides other programs. Reference: Chinese Historical and Cultural Project 1988; Yu 1991: 51, 111-112.

Phillipsville, Santa Clara County.
After the fire that destroyed Market Street Chinatown in the City of San Jose in 1870, some
Chinese relocated to the area of Hobson Street and San Pedro Street near the San Jose Woolen
Mill. The concentration of Chinese became known as Phillipsville
, Phillips being the individual
most responsible for the relocation. It ceased to exist in 1902
. See Big Jim's Chinatown, Santa
Clara County; Woolen Mill Chinatown
, Santa Clara County. Reference: Yu 1991: 36,43.

Quon Mon Lee Fishing Camp, Santa Clara County.
The Quon Mon Lee Company most likely established a shrimp fishing camp southeast of where Redwood Creek is joined by Corkscrew Slough in present-day Redwood City. Two five-man junks operated out of the camp in 1892. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980d.
San Jose Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
By 1870, San Jose Chinatown, City of San Jose, was centered on Market Street and San Fernando
Street
. It contained 532 residents, most of who worked in the agricultural industry. A fire
destroyed many of its buildings in 1870, causing residents to temporarily relocate to Vine Street
next to the Guadalupe River. The Chinese returned to the Market Street location after Ng Fook
of San Francisco build several brick buildings for their use. By 1887
, San Jose Chinatown's
population was more than one thousand and was the headquarters for the Chinese of Santa Clara
County. A fire on May 4, 1887 destroyed many structures, bringing about its demise. See Ah Toy
Alley, Santa Clara County; Big Jim's Chinatown
, Santa Clara County; Heinlenville, Santa Clara
County; Phillipsville, Santa Clara County; Vine Street Chinatown; Woolen Mills Chinatown.
Reference
: Yu 1991: 21-24, 29-30.
San Jose Chinese American Cemetery, Santa Clara County.
The cemetery is located at 350 Curtner Avenue, City of San Jose. It was established in 1900 by
the organizations of Ning Yung, Sam Yup, Kwong Chow, Yeong Wo, Hop Wo, Shu Hing, Yen
Hoi and Yan Woo The front wall, gate and altar were rebuilt in the 1960's and 1970's
. The
ceremonial burner dates to 1900
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980e.
Santa Clara Business Areas, Santa Clara County.
(1) There was a Chinese business area on the north side of Franklin Street between Lafayette
Street and Washington Street
, town of Santa Clara. By 1887, it consisted of two laundries.
Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1887b.
(2) A second Chinese business area in the town of Santa Clara was located on the south side of
Franklin Street between Jackson Street and Main Street in 1887
. There were three laundries and
one dwelling. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1887b
,
Vine Street Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Located on Vine Street next to the Guadalupe River in the City of San Jose, the Vine Street
Chinatown came into being after the 1870 fire destroyed much of the San Jose Chinatown. See
San Jose Chinatown, Santa Clara County. Reference: Yu 1991: 19-24
.
Woolen Mills Chinatown, Santa Clara County.
Woolen Mills Chinatown at Hobson Street and San Pedro Street in the City of San Jose, was next
to the mill; hence, its name
. Established by Mitchell Phillips and run by Chin Shin (also known
as Big Jim), it sought to house the Chinese displaced by the San Jose Chinatown fire of 1887
. But
it quickly faded away when Big Jim left and Heinlenville became a reality. See Big Jim's
Chinatown, Santa Clara County; Heinlenville, Santa Clara County. Reference: Yu 1991: 36.

 Solano County
Benicia Chinatown, Solano County.
Benicia Chinatown, City of Benicia, was located on both sides of First Street between E Street
and F Street in 1891
. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1891a. 

Big Camp, Solano County.
Big Camp was a Chinese farm camp located on the Hatch Ranch in Suisun Valley near present-
day Solano Community College on Suisun Valley Road. Starting about 1870, the settlement
contained residences, stores, various organizations
, gambling rooms and a population that reached
over 1,000-- all from Loong Doo Province in China. The laborers were said to be instrumental
in developing the fruit industry of the area. A unique aspect of Big Camp was a process where the
laborers had an opportunity to advance to foreman status
. This often resulted in them being independent ranchers. Big Camp faded away around 1929. Reference: Leung 1997: 8-9.

Chinese Cut, Solano County.
Chinese Cut is an indentation or small bay along the course of the Sacramento River about 46
miles south of the City of Sacramento. On earlier maps
, it is identified as Chinamans Cut.
Reference: United States Geological Survey 1978.

Dixon Chinese Business Area, Solano County.
The Chinese business area in the town of Dixon was on the east side of First Street between B
Street and C Street in 1884. There were two laundries and one store. All three were gone by 1888.
Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1888a, 1884b.

Hi Chung Laundry, Solano County.
Hi Chung Laundry appears to have been a source of work and the home for the few Chinese in
the town of Elmira during the 1880's. In fact, the 1880 United States Census taker recorded seven
of the nine Elmira Chinese men living at the laundry. Their occupations were laundry men (3),
cooks (2) and laborers (2)
. The laundry and the Chinese disappeared by the 1890 census. Yet, the
building and its distinctive sign persisted. Reference: Wey 1988: 146.

Lower Chinatown, Solano County.
Lower Chinatown was another name for Old Vallejo Chinatown. See Old Vallejo Chinatown,
Solano County.

New Vallejo Chinatown, Solano County.
New Vallejo Chinatown was along Marin Street in the City of Vallejo. It was also known as
Upper Chinatown because of its location further up the hill slope. In 1886
, there were three
laundries. Like the remains of Old Vallejo Chinatown, it was destroyed as part of a redevelopment
project in the 1960's. See Old Vallejo Chinatown, Solano County. Reference
: Sanborn Insurance
Map 1886c; Wong 1988: 161, 165.

Old Vallejo Chinatown, Solano County.
Old Vallejo Chinatown was located on Sonoma Street, City of Vallejo. It was also known as
Lower Chinatown because it was lower on the hill slope than New Vallejo Chinatown. Old
Vallejo Chinatown had a relatively stable population because of the employment opportunities
at nearby Mare Island Navy Yard. There was a Kuomingtang office
, Young China Association
headquarters, Chinese language school as well as businesses and residences. Most of Old Vallejo
Chinatown was destroyed in the late 1930's with the entire area being demolished as part of a 
redevelopment project in the 1960's. See New Vallejo Chinatown, Solano County. Reference:
Wong 1988: 154, 158, 161, 165.
Rio Vista Chinatown, Solano County.
Rio Vista Chinatown was located in the Sacramento River town of Rio Vista. Most of the Chinese
who lived there were from the Toishan District of South China. The residents provided much of
the labor needed for the potato crops. When soil diseases reduced potato farming, asparagus
growing became important
. The community prospered into the 1920s. Reference: Chu 1970: 28.

Suisun Chinese Business Area, Solano County.
The Chinese business area in the town of Suisun was on the east side of Main Street from
Sacramento Street to Solano Street
, extending along the north side of Solano Street by 1888.
There were two laundries and two dwellings. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1888e.
Upper Chinatown, Solano County.
Upper Chinatown was an alternate name for New Vallejo Chinatown. See New Vallejo
Chinatown, Solano County
.
Vacaville Chinatown, Solano County.
Vacaville Chinatown, in the community of Vacaville, started with a Chinese laundry in 1870 that
was located around Dobbins Street
. Initial settlers included the Yee family who located near the
present-day firehouse around First Street
. Many of the early structures were made of tin--no doubt
rather hot inside during the summer
. By 1888, Vacaville Chinatown extended along Kendall
Street between Dobbins Street and Barnard Street along Ulatis Creek
. There were two laundries,
a temple
, stores and three dwellings. Most of Vacaville Chinatown was gone by the 1940's. Today,
only one building remains and it is on the corner of Dobbins Street and Kendall Street
. Reference:
Begell l997: 14; Limbaugh 1984: 247-249; Sanborn Insurance Map 1888f.

Sonoma County

Buena Vista Winery, Sonoma County.
Chinese laborers were first employed in construction of the winery in the town of Sonoma in
1857
. At that time, they built a tunnel for the storage of wine. They dug an additional storage
tunnel in 1858 and another in 1862. Also in 1862
, they planted more than 20,000 grape vines. The
next year saw the Chinese constructing more wine cellars and working in the production of
champagne
. In 1864, there were 1 00 Chinese employed at the winery. By the 1890's, the Chinese
were being displaced from the wine industry throughout the state because of technological
changes, cheaper labor and the Chinese Exclusion Act
. The winery is California Historical
Landmark No. 392. See Greystone Winery
, Sonoma County. Reference: Heintz 1977: 22-24,42-
54,62-65. 

China Slough, Sonoma County.

China Slough is actually an oxbow lake, a meander of Sonoma Creek that separated from the
creek. The creek itself empties into San Pablo Bay about 20 miles northeast of San Raphael
between Highwa
y 37 and 48. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1951.

Chinese Gulch, Sonoma County.
Chinese Gulch has a one-mile-long stream flowing through it that joins the ocean about two miles
west of the town of Plantation
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1977.

Guerneville Chinese Business Area, Sonoma County.

The Guerneville Chinese business area in the town of Guerneville was on the south side of Second
Street near Church Alle
y. By July 1885 there were two laundries. Both were gone by 1897.
Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1897, 1885a.

Petaluma Chinatown, Sonoma County.

Petaluma Chinatown, City of Petaluma, was on the east side of B Street between Third Street and
Fourth Street. In 1885
, it consisted of a hotel, store, offices and a school. By 1888, only the school
remained. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1888c
, 1885b.

Santa Rosa Chinese Business Area, Sonoma County.

The Santa Rosa Chinese business area, City of Santa Rosa, was between First Street and Fourth
Street and Main Street and D Street in 1885. It had seven laundries and three dwellings. All were
gone by 1893
. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1893, 1885c.

Sonoma Chinatown, Sonoma County.

Sonoma Chinatown, in the town of Sonoma, was located at Sonoma Plaza, an eight-acre area on
the National Historic Register. Sonoma Chinatown covered the west side of the plaza and
was east
of Spain Street. It served the Chinese from the 1860's to the 1900's with restaurants
, a general
merchandise store
, laundry, rooming houses and a gambling and meeting hall. Reference: Wong
1987: 106-108.

Sonoma County Museum, Sonoma County.
Sonoma County Museum at 425 Seventh Street, City of Santa Rosa, has a permanent exhibit of
Sonoma Count
y history that includes the role of the Chinese in developing the county.

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