The Central Coast

Monterey County
Brooklyn Chinatown, Monterey County.
Brooklyn Chinatown, founded in 1888, was the common name for Pajaro Chinatown. The name
Brooklyn was taken from a street within the relocated Chinatown. The name Pajaro is
attributable to nearby Pajaro River
. The relocation refers to Watsonville Chinatown. See Pajaro
Chinatown, Monterey County
; Watsonville Chinatown, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Clark
1991: 101
.
Castroville Chinatown, Monterey County.
Castroville Chinatown, in the town of Castroville, began in the 1870's with the last building
destroyed by a fire in 1978
. The Chinatown itself was located along the east side of McDougall Street between Speegle Street and Sanchez Street. Reference: Clark 1991: 102.
Chews Ridge, Monterey County.
Although often considered a Chinese placename, the ridge was actually named after Constantine Marcus Chew, a Euroamerican from Ohio. Chew obtained a patent on the land in 1890 and 1892. It is about four miles south of Jamesburg. Reference: Clark 1991: 98; United States Geological Survey 1949b.
China Beach, Monterey County.
China Beach, near Little Sur River, is thought to be named for Jim Fat, a Chinese abalone and seaweed fisherman who lived there around 1910. Reference: Clark 1991: 99.
China Camp, Monterey County.
(1) China Camp was the site of the Chinese workers who were brought to the area to build a road to then Tassajara Hot Springs Resort in the 1930's. Today, it is Tassajara Zen Meditation Center. Located in the Los Padres National Forest, it is approximately 16 miles south of Carmel Valley off Highway 16. Reference: Clark 1991: 99; United States Geological Survey 1949b. 
(2) China Camp, at the mouth of Salmon Creek, was most likely used by Chinese fishermen during the fishing season. The place name appears on a 1888 United States Coast and Geodetic Survey map covering the area from Fancher Ranch to Prewett Creek. Reference: Clark 1991: 99.
(3) China Camp at the south fork of Partington Creek in Big Sur is actually named Swiss Camp, being named after Swiss lumbermen who stayed there. The site was mistakenly called China Camp by State Park Rangers during the 1960's and 1970's. The name is thought to be derived from a large board fence in lower Partington Creek known as China Wall
. Apparently, the rangers made an association with the structure and the camp; consequently, it became known as China Camp. See China Wall, Monterey County. Reference: Clark 1991: 553.

China Cove, Monterey County.
(1) China Cove was a small, possibly seasonal, Chinese fishing village south of Point Lobos between Bird Island and Vierra Knoll in Point Lobos State Reserve. The cove was often associated with the smuggling of Chinese immigrants into the country once the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 went into effect. Reference: Clark 1991: 99; Editors of Olympus Press 1988: 137; United States Geological Survey 1983.
(2) China Cove at Pebble Beach was a center of Chinese fishing activity from 1868 to 1912. Reference: Clark 1991: 100.

China Gulch, Monterey County.
(1) China Gulch is a three and one-half miles long stream within the Hunter Liggett Military Reserve. It flows west to east into the San Antonio River near Sam Jones Road. It was the location of Chinese placer mining activity during the 1860's and 1870's. Reference: Clark 1991:100; United States Geological Survey 1949c.
(2) China Gulch is about five miles northwest of Mission San Antonio. It is a one and one-half mile long intermittent stream that enters the San Antonio River just to the east of Del Venturi Road and is northwest of China Gulch near Sam Jones Road. It was the location of many Chinese placer mines. Reference: Clark 1991: 1 00; United States Geological Survey 1949a.

China Gulch Chinatown, Monterey County.
China Gulch Chinatown was about four miles south-of Jolon and one mile north of Sam Jones Canyon. It consisted of 100 to 150 Chinese who worked a placer gold mining claim on nearby Milpitas Ranch. The claim was leased by the Ning Yung Company of San Francisco for a ten-year period. Reference: Clark 1991: 100.

China Wall, Monterey County.
China Wall on Lower Partington Creek in Big Sur was a fence made of boards. State Park Rangers gave it its name but their reason is no longer known. See China Camp, Monterey County. Reference: Clark 1991: 553.


China Point, Monterey County.
China Point is land that protrudes out into the sea about one-half mile south of the mouth of the Little Sur River and marks the northern boundary of China Beach. See China Beach, Monterey County. Reference: Clark 1991: 100.

Chinese Abalone Camp, Monterey County.
Chinese Abalone Camp was a name sometimes used for Pescadero Chinese Village at Stillwater Cove. See Pescadero Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Chinese Fishery, Monterey County.
(1) Chinese Fishery was most likely the same place as Point Alones Chinese Village. See Point Alones Chinese Village, Monterey County.
(2) Chinese Fishery seems to have been another name for Pescadero Chinese Village. See Pescadero Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Chinese Fishing Village, Monterey County.
This was another name for Point Alones Chinese Village. See Point Alones Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Franklin-Washington Chinatown, Monterey County.
Franklin- Washington Chinatown was in the City of Monterey. The beginnings of the one block long Chinatown on Franklin Street between Tyler Street and Washington Street can be traced to the 1870's. It persisted until the 1930's when civic concern about the area and the opening of Fort Ord some distance away caused its demise. Today, the area is occupied by parking garages. See The Badlands, Monterey County. Reference: Lydon 1985: 387-90.
Jone Quock Mui Historical Marker, Monterey County.
Jone Quock Mui Historical Marker is located along Monterey Bay Coastal Trail between Irving Avenue and Prescott Avenue, City of Monterey. Jone Quock Mui was born at Point Lobos in 1859. After marriage, she and the family eventually settled at McAbee Beach, owning the home at 774 Wave Street (Cannery Row). Reference: Swackhamer 2012. 

McAbee Beach Chinatown, Monterey County.
After the fire at Point Alones Chinese Village, many Chinese relocated to McAbee Beach, creating a new community. The Chinese brought some of the surviving structures with them and lived in existing buildings that faced today's Cannery Row. Fire and pressure from expanding canneries brought the community to an end during the 1920's. Reference: Lydon 1985: 377-86.
Monterey Chinatown, Monterey County.
Monterey Chinatown may be an additional name for Franklin-Washington Chinatown. See Franklin-Washington Chinatown, Monterey County. Reference: Raven 1987: 232-233.
Monterey County Historical Museum, Monterey County.
Monterey County Historical Museum at 333 Boronda Road, City of Salinas, has rotating exhibits of Chinese artifacts.
Our Chinese Colony, Monterey County.
Our Chinese Colony along Stillwell Cove appears to be an additional name of Pescadero Chinese Village. See Pescadero Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Pacific Grove Chinatown, Monterey County.
Pacific Grove Chinatown was a fishing village on Monterey Bay. It was established between 1850 and 1852. It grew in size, ultimately containing 50 cabins, a store, temple and outdoor shrine. By 1900, the community specialized in catching and processing squid. However, an arson fire in 1906 marked the end of the village. Reference: Ma 1981: 146-147.
Pajaro Chinatown, Monterey County.
Pajaro Chinatown was originally in Watsonville. It moved across the Pajaro River in 1888, its main street becoming Brooklyn Street. It contained about 20 Chinese structures. One interesting aspect of the Pajaro Chinatown was its laundry. It became an important staging place for the Chinese Empire Reform Army soldiers who, having completed their training, were going to Mexico. Once in Mexico, they would be smuggled into China to help Sun Yat-sen in the Nationalist revolution. Fire destroyed Pajaro Chinatown in 1933. The property eventually became a housing tract with its main street being Brooklyn Street in honor of the old Chinatown. See Watsonville Chinatown, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Clark 1991: 101; Glick 1945: 232-233.
Pebble Beach Chinatown, Monterey County.
Pebble Beach Chinatown at Stillwell Cove was apparently the same as the Pescadero Chinese Village. See Pescadero Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Pebble Beach Chinese Fishing Village, Monterey County.
Pebble Beach Chinese Fishing Village was an alternate name for Stillwater Cove's Pescadero Chinese Village. See Pescadero Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Pescadero Chinese Village, Monterey County.
Pescadero Chinese Village first appeared on maps in 1876 and was identified as Chinese Fishery. But an earlier Chinese presence was indicated by a lease agreement between China Man Hop and the land owner dated 1868. Within the lease is reference to the site as "Old China House." Pescadero Chinese Village became a tourist attraction when the Seventeen Mile Drive was developed in 1881. Pescadero Chinese Village persisted until 1912. Today, it is the seventeenth green of the Pebble Beach Golf Course. Reference: Clark 1991: 100; Lydon 1985: 142-49.

Point Almejas Chinese Cemetery, Monterey County.
Point Almejas Chinese Cemetery was used from 1889 until 1907, when the Chinese left Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village. See Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village, Monterey County. Reference: Lydon 1985: 107.
Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village, Monterey County.
Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village appeared on maps in 1884 simply as Chinatown. The settlement is thought to date to the 1850's. One of the larger concentrations of Chinese in the area, it was effectively brought to an end by a fire in 1906. Present-day Hopkins Marine Station occupies the site. Reference: Clark 1991: 101; Lydon 1985: 139.
Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village Cemetery, Monterey County.
Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village Cemetery was next to Point Alones Chinese Fishing Village. The cemetery was moved to, Point Almejas in 1889 because of railroad construction through the area. See Point Almejas Chinese Cemetery, Monterey County. Reference: Lydon 1985: 107.
Point Joe, Monterey County.
Point Joe is halfway between Point Pinos and Point Cypress by the Seventeen Mile Drive on Monterey Peninsula. A solitary Chinese man known as Joe by local residents, lived, collected flotsam and tended goats on the point. Eventually, the bit of land protruding into the Pacific Ocean came to be named after him. The place name appeared on maps by 1898 and persists today. Reference: Clark 1991: 101 .
Point Lobos Chinatown, Monterey County.
Point Lobos Chinatown at Whalers Cove may have been established as early as 1851. By 1876, it was recorded as Chinese Fishery on a United States Coast Survey map. The site was abandoned between 1876 and 1880. Reference: Clark 1991: 100.
Salinas Chinatown, Monterey County.
Salinas Chinatown began in 1872 and was located between San Juan Road (today's North Main Street), East Lake Street, Pajaro Street and the railroad tracks in the City of Salinas. It contained residences, stores, Confucius Church and joss house. Most of the Chinatown was destroyed by fire in 1893. A new Chinatown soon appeared and was known as Soledad Chinatown. See Soledad Chinatown, Monterey County. Reference: "1886 First Chinatown."; Clark 1991: 102.
Salinas Chinese Cemetery, Monterey County.
Salinas Chinese Cemetery at 60 Natividad Street, City of Salinas, was established on December 16, 1900 by the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Society. Initially, it was used for temporary burial. After World War II, it became a place of permanent internment and is still in operation. Reference: Clark 1991: 102.

Soledad Chinatown, Monterey County.
The second Chinatown in the City of Salinas developed after the first was destroyed by fire in 1893. It was located along the north end of Soledad Street and East Lake Street and became Soledad Chinatown because of its location on Soledad Street in the City of Salinas. See Salinas Chinatown, Monterey County. Reference: "1900 Second Chinatown."
The Badlands, Monterey County.
The Badlands is another name for Franklin-Washington Chinatown of Monterey. It apparently gained the name because of the opium, gambling and prostitution that were available there. See Franklin-Washington Chinatown, Monterey County. Reference: Lydon 1985: 387-390.
Thomas Cole House, Monterey County.
Thomas Cole House is at 230 Oliver Street, City of Monterey. The structure became the headquarters for the local National Chinese Political Party in the early 1940's. Reference: Swackhamer 2013.

Wing Chong Store, Monterey County.
Wing Chong Store at 835 Cannery Row in the City of Monterey was built in 1918. The store was founded by Won Lee who came to the United States from Canton in 1914. Won Yee also operated a squid processing business, employing as many as 150 people during its peak period of 1928 to 1930. The store, made famous in John Steinbeck's Cannery Row, is the last remnant of McAbee Beach Chinatown. See McAbee Beach Chinatown, Monterey County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980a.

San Benito County
Hollister Chinese Business Area, San Benito County.
The Chinese business area in the town of Hollister was located on the north side of Fifth Street between San Benito Street and East Street. Listed in a 1886 map were one laundry and a store. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1886.
JimJack House, San Benito County.
JimJack (pronounced as one word) was a Chinese man who lived in the San Juan area in the early 1860's. Also know as China Jim and Poison Jim, he developed the idea of harvesting wild mustard seed for its oil, a favorite seasoning in China and Europe. His house was restored in 2006 and relocated from its Mission Vineyard Road, now California State Highway 156, to 3rd Street and Monterey Street, town of San Juan Baubtista. The new location is near the San Juan Baubtista Historic Park. Reference: Eliason, Robert. n.d. "JimJack: "The Mustard King." BenitoLink. https://benitolink.com/jim-jack-the-mustard-king/ accessed June 1, 2021; Lydon 1985: 67-68; Pierce 1977: 25.
San Felipe Chinese Community, San Benito County.
By 1880, the United States Census showed about 250 Chinese living in the town of San Felipe. It is thought that most worked in the cigar factories of San Felipe. Reference: Docent 1998.

San Luis Obispo County

Ah Louis Brick Yard, San Luis Obispo County.
Ah Louis established the first brick yard in the county in 1872. Initially, it was located near Center Street and Lincoln Street within the town of San Luis Obispo. It later moved to an area between San Luis Mountain and Bishop Peak outside the town and was sold in 1910. See Ah Louis Store, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Wong 1987: 8, 11.

Ah Louis Farms, San Luis Obispo County.
Ah Louis operated eight separate farms with a combined acreage of 3,500 acres between 1897 and 1924. The farms were scattered in and around the town of San Luis Obispo. Eventually, the vegetable and grain growing operation shifted to seed farming. This move helped establish the Central Coast as a major seed producing region in California. See Ah Louis Store, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Ochs 1968: 16-45; Wong 1987: 30-32.

Ah Louis Mural, San Luis Obispo County.
Unveiled on September 18, 1997, the large mural occupies most of the wall of a parking structure near the Ah Louis Store in the City of San Luis Obispo. The mural consists of two Chinese characters. The first is Joy and symbolizes the Chinese immigrant's hope in a new land. The second character is Love and represents the Chinese love for their land of birth. Within each character is a series of tile mosaics depicting the history of Ah Louis and the early Chinese. See Ah Louis Store, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Krieger 1997; News and Notes 1997: 2.  Photo.

Ah Louis Road, San Luis Obispo County.
Ah Louis Road connected two farms outside of the town of San Luis Obispo that were owned by Ah Louis. After his death in 1936, it became Biddle Ranch Road. See Ah Louis Store, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Wong 1987: 32.

Ah Louis Store, San Luis Obispo County.
After arriving from China, Ah Louis worked as a gold miner, laborer and cook. His name was actually Wong On but he changed it to Ah Louis. He initially wrote his name as "Ah Luis," later adding an "0" to the spelling while having a pronunciation of "Lou-e." Ah Louis opened the first Chinese-owned store in the county in the town of San Luis Obispo. Established in 1874 and moved to its present location in 1885, it became a focal point for the Chinese of the area. Within the store, Ah Louis acted as banker, translator, arbitrator and labor contractor. He brought thousands of Chinese into the county for work in the mines, on the railroad and in road construction and land reclamation. The store is California Historical Landmark No. 802 with a plaque installed by the California State Parks Commission, San Luis Obispo Historical Society,
and the sons and daughters of Ah Louis in 1965. See Ah Louis Brick Yard, San Luis Obispo County; Ah Louis Farms, San Luis Obispo County; Ah Louis Mural, San Luis Obispo County; Ah Louis Road, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Hamilton 1974: 77; Ochs 1968: 16-45; Office of Historic Preservation 1990: 216; Wong 1987: 1-45.

Arroyo de Los Chinos, San Luis Obispo County.
Arroyo de Los Chinos, near Piedras Blancas, is a ravine with an east-to-west flowing stream. It travels about three and one-half miles before discharging into the Pacific Ocean. See China, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1959.

Arroyo Grande Chinatown, San Luis Obispo County.
Anti-Chinese activity in the 1880's became so strong in the town of Arroyo Grande that the non-Chinese population was able to ship many Chinese out of town in railroad cars. The few remaining Chinese left by 1886. Reference: Morem 1997: 3; Ochs 1968: 62-63

Cambria Chinatown, San Luis Obispo County.
The common name for Cambria Chinatown was Cambria Chinese Center. See Cambria Chinese Center, San Luis Obispo County.

Cambria Chinese Center, San Luis Obispo County.

Cambria Chinese Center was the name of the Chinatown in the community of Cambria. It was at Bridge Street to the south of Center Street and extended along the north bank of Santa Rosa Creek. It consisted of a few small buildings used as residences, a bunk house, a Buddhist temple and a joss house. Cambria Chinese Center disappeared by 1916 when the last of its inhabitants left the area. See Cambria Temple, San Luis Obispo County. Reference:Hamilton 1974: 86.

Cambria Joss House, San Luis Obispo County.
See Cambria Temple, San Luis Obispo County.

Cambria Temple, San Luis Obispo County.

The original Chinatown of Cambria contained a Buddhist temple and joss house. By 1916, the
temple and joss house
, both made of redwood planks, were moved and joined with the B. H.
Franklin Building. Subsequently, they were moved to their present location where they form
portions of a residence. The temple became the living room and retains the altar shelf for the
Buddha. The joss house became the kitchen. Chinese newspapers still line some shelves. 
See Cambria Chinese Center, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Hamilton 1974: 93.

China, San Luis Obispo County.

The abandoned settlement known as China is on the coast just north of the mouth of Arroyo de Los Chinos. It is approximately ten and one-half miles north of San Simeon on Highway 1. See Arroyo de Los Chinos, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1959.

China Cove, San Luis Obispo County.

Sea lettuce, a type of sea weed, was farmed for more than 100 years by the Chinese at China Cove. The cove is located about two miles north of the town of Cayucos. A Chinese immigrant named How Wong took over his uncle's operation at the cove when the uncle became too elderly to continue. How Wong, born in San Francisco in 1894, worked the farm until the 1960's when it was abandoned. The cove was a particularly good place for cultivation of sea lettuce, used as both a medicine and food additive. Sea lettuce or ulva, has a large, broad, wavy-edged leaf twelve inches or more in length. It grows best on certain types of rocks. Cultivation involved clearing the rocks of other plants in November or December and the planting of ulva. Wave action and abundant sun light prompted bumper crops that were harvested in April. The crop was dried to a rubbery texture in rectangular mats measuring 12 inches by 18 inches and 3 inches deep. China Cove and China Point now have protected status because of the area's purchase by the Trust of Public Lands. See China Harbor, San Luis Obispo County; China Point, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Hamilton 1974: 85-86; Nash: 1973: 1-25; Palmer 1998: AI, A7. Photo (pen and ink drawing by Ben Williams). 

China Harbor, San Luis Obispo County.
China Harbor is a south-facing indentation along the coast. Identified on a map as China Harbor, it is more widely known as China Cove. Thus, China Harbor may be another name for China Cove. See China Cove, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1965.

China Point, San Luis Obispo County.
China Point, about two miles north of Cayucos, is a rock outcrop that extends seaward from the land and helps form China Cove. The rocks of the point are particularly good for growing sea lettuce. See China Cove, San Luis Obispo County.

Chinatown Historic District, San Luis Obispo County.
The City of San Luis Obispo delineated the area around Palm Street as the Chinatown Historic District. Established in 1995, it notes the importance of San Luis Obispo Chinatown and its residents in the development of the city and county. See San Luis Obispo Chinatown, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: San Luis Obispo Tribune 1999. 

Chinese Center, San Luis Obispo County.
This was a shortened name for the Cambria Chinese Center in the town of Cambria. See Cambria Chinese Center, San Luis Obispo County.

Iron Road Pioneers Statue, San Luis Obispo County.
A metal sculpture commemorating Chinese railroad workers forms the center piece of a traffic circle at 1000 Railroad Avenue, City of San Luis Obispo. The artist was Elizabeth MacQueen.. Photo.

San Luis Obispo Chinatown, San Luis Obispo County.
San Luis Obispo Chinatown was centered on Palm Street in the town of San Luis Obispo by 1872. It was not until the arrival of Ah Louis that it gained in prominence within the county. It soon had a more or less stable population of 400 to 600. That number would increase to as much as 2,000 when labor crews were brought in by Ah Louis. The decline of San Luis Obispo Chinatown resulted in just a few buildings surviving past World War II. Today, only Ah Louis Store and Shanghai Low Restaurant building exist. See Ah Louis Store, San Luis Obispo County; Shanghai Low Restaurant Building, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Kreiger 1997: B3; Ochs 1966: 7, 47-69.

 San Luis Obispo Chinese Cemetery, San Luis Obispo County.
Located near Higuerra Street and Bridge Street in the town of San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo Chinese Cemetery was for Chinese use only. By 1936, grave markers were removed and the land was cultivated. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980b.
San Miguel Chinatown, San Luis Obispo County.
San Miguel Chinatown was a small community within the town of San Miguel. Anti-Chinese sentiment became so strong that all the Chinese fled by 1890. Reference: Ochs 1966: 63.
Shanghai Low Restaurant Building, San Luis Obispo County.
Shanghai Low Restaurant building on Palm Street, City of San Luis Obispo, was part of the early San Luis Obispo Chinatown. Dating to the 1920's, the restaurant was originally located across the street. It moved to its present location in 1950. See San Luis Obispo Chinatown, San Luis Obispo County. Reference: Stover 1999.

Santa Cruz County
Arroyo del Chino, Santa Cruz County.
Arroyo del Chino is a steep-sided ravine near the town of Aptos. Next to the ravine was the home of Raphael Castro. According to the 1850 United States Census, a Chinese was reported to be living in the house. Thus, it is thought that the place name is derived from the occupancy. Reference: Lydon 1985: 20.
Birkenseer's Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.
Birkenseer's Chinatown, City of Santa Cruz, developed after the Front Street Chinatown fire of 1895. The land upon which it was built belonged to George Birkenseer and Dr. P.B. Fager. 
Birkenseer's Place. Santa Cruz County.
Birenseer's Place was an alternate name for Birkenseer's Chinatown. See Birkenseer's Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.

Blackburn's Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.
Blackburn's Chinatown, City of Santa Cruz, developed after the Front Street Chinatown fire of 1895. The land owner was Mrs. Harriet Mead Blackburn
China Beach, Santa Cruz County.
China Beach is within New Brighton State Beach. The beach was the location of a Chinese fishing village. A plaque placed at the site bears the inscription: "During the 1870's and 1880's, a small village constructed of scrap lumber and driftwood was erected at the base of these cliffs, known as China Beach or China Cove. It was established by Chinese fishermen who set their nets by boat and then hauled their daily catch onto the beach by hand for drying and selling. By 1890, however, the expanding resort, industry and waves of anti- Chinese sentiment had combined to force the last of the Chinese fishermen out of Santa Cruz County. Dedicated October 29, 1984 by the Monterey Viejo Chapter No. 1846, E. Clampus Vitus." The Pacific Migrations Visitor Center  within the park has numerous displays related to China Beach. Reference: Editors of Olympus Press 1988: 127. Photo.

China Camp, Santa Cruz County.
Located in The Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, the historic site known as China Camp was where as many as 200 Chinese workers lived in 1883. They were employed by the Lorna Prieta Railroad Company and built the rail line that extends through the area. No Chinese were there after 1895. See China Ridge, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Clark 1986: 73.
China Cove, Santa Cruz County.
This was another name for China Beach. See China Beach, Santa Cruz County.
China Grade Road, Santa Cruz County.
(1) China Grade Road extends about three and one-half miles northwest of Boulder Creek near the northern end of Big Basin. It was constructed in the 1880's. When the county assumed ownership, the road was improved and extended by Chinese labor; thereby gaining its current name. Reference: Clark 1986: 73., Photo.
(2) China Grade Road connects Santa Cruz County and San Mateo County. It was built by Chinese laborers in 1903. The "grade" or inclined portion, extends nine-tenths of a mile into Santa Cruz County. Reference: Brown 1975: 18.
China Ladder, Santa Cruz County.
Chinese abalone fishermen lived atop the bluff that overlooked the Pacific Ocean on the Rancho Agua Puerca near the town of Swanton. To reach the rocks upon which the abalone grew, they climbed part-way down the cliff via a foot path. Next, they used a rope to descend to a ladder. The ladder portion brought them to the abalone grounds. Through the years, the ladder became a local landmark referred to as China Ladder. See China Ladder Beach, Santa Cruz County.
Reference: Hoover 1937: 581
Photo.
China Ladder Beach, Santa Cruz County.
China Ladder Beach is at the base of China Ladder. See China Ladder, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Clark 1986: 73. Photo.
China Ladder Gulch, Santa Cruz County.
China Ladder Gulch is next to China Ladder. See China Ladder, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Clark 1986: 74.
China Lane. Santa Cruz County.
China Lane was an alternate name for Birkenseer's Chinatown. See Birkenseer's Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.

China Ridge, Santa Cruz County.
Chinese laborers worked on the railroad in the area of China Ridge between Aptos Creek and Bridge Creek about six miles north-northwest of the town of Soquel. Tunnels and a road bed were constructed in Aptos Canyon, a steep and rugged terrain. Later, loggers who worked the area between 1883 and 1923 identified the ridge separating Aptos Creek and Bridge Creek as China Ridge, possibly in memory of the Chinese who toiled so diligently. The ridge is some 1,900 feet above sea level and is part of The Forest of Nisene Marks State Park. See China Camp, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Lydon 1985: 494; United States Geological Survey. 1955. Photo.
Chinatown Bridge, Santa Cruz County.
The foot bridge spans San Lorenzo River. It connects Lorenzo Park and Santa Cruz Chinatown. The name Chinatown Bridge gives recognition to the Chinatown's contribution to the City of Santa Cruz. See Santa Cruz Chinatown, Santa Cruz County. Reference: York 2018. Photo.
Chinese Section Evergreen Cemetery, Santa Cruz County.
Chinese Section of the Evergreen Cemetery is in the Evergreen Cemetery, Evergreen Street, City of Santa Cruz. The site contains a plaque, gate, ceremonial area, commemorative stele, funeral burner and several headstones. The remains of most of the Chinese buried there have been removed. Reference: McDannold 2019. Photo.

Front Street Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.
Front Street Chinatown was the second Chinatown in the City of Santa Cruz. After it burned in  1895, the displaced residents developed the Birkenseer's Chinatown and Blackburn's Chinatown. Eventually it was once again established along Front Street. The last remaining structure was razed in 1955. See Birkenseer's Chinatown, Santa Cruz county; Blackburn's Chinatown, Santa Cruz County; Santa Cruz Chinatown, Santa Cruz County. Reference: York 2018. Photo.
Front Street Chinatown Plaque, Santa Cruz County.
The plaque is located near the entrance to the galleria at 740 Front Street, City of Santa Cruz. It commemorates those who lived in the Chinatown. Reference: York 2018. Photo
Pacific Avenue Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.
Pacific Avenue Chinatown was the original Chinatown of the City of Santa Cruz. It was located on Willow Street, now Pacific Avenue. It lasted about 12 years. See Santa Cruz Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.
Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, Santa Cruz County.
Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History at 705 Front Street, City of Santa Cruz, has frequent exhibits depicting the Chinese of the Santa Cruz area.
Suey Hing Benevolent Society Building, Santa Cruz County.
Suey Hing Benevolent Society building, located at 118 Riverside Drive, City of Watsonville, was built in 1930. It is the last vestige of Watsonville Chinatown. See Watsonville Chinatown, Santa Cruz County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980c
Watsonville Chinatown, Santa Cruz County.
Watsonville Chinatown was near the center of the City of Watsonville at Maple Street and Union Street. Most of its residents were agricultural workers. As the city grew, Watsonville Chinatown was seen as an obstacle. Therefore, it was decided that it would be moved. Apparently, the Chinese agreed to the move. Consequently, in June 1888, Watsonville Chinatown moved about one mile south across the Pajaro River into Monterey County. Dupont Street was the main road with a parallel street named Brooklyn Street. It had a population of about 800 by 1900. See Brooklyn Chinatown, Monterey County; Pajaro Chinatown, Monterey County. Reference: Lydon 1975: 219-241.

Watsonville Chinese Concentration, Santa Cruz County.
Watsonville Chinese Concentration was located on Grove Street, City of Watsonville. It was near the apple drying houses in the 1930's. Its disappearance was attributed to an aging Chinese population and the second generation relocating away from the concentration. Reference: CIRCA 2007: 133.

References

"1886 First Chinatown." Portraying Salinas Chinatown's Past, Presence and Future.                     Asian Cultural Experience. 2017. https://acesalinas.wordpress.com/ Accessed                 June 23, 2019.  
"1900 Second Chinatown." Portraying Salinas Chinatown's Past, Presence and                         Future. Asian Cultural Experience. 2017. https://acesalinas.wordpress.com/                     Accessed June 23, 2019.  
CIRCA 2007.  Historic Context Statement for the City of Watsonville. San Francisco,                     California.
Clark, Donald T. 1991. Monterey County Place Names. Carmel Valley: Kestrel Press.
____ . 1986. Santa Cruz County Place Names. Santa Cruz Historical Association.
Docent 1998. October 16, San Benito County Historical Society. E-mail.
Editors of Olympus Press. 1988. California State Parks Guide. Santa Barbara: Olympus                 Press.
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