The Western Sierra

Chinese, Plumas, Butte, Sierra, Nevada, Yuba, Colusa, Placer, Sutter, El Dorada, Amador, Calaveras, Toulumne, Mariposa, Madera,


Amador County
Amador Chinese Business Area, Amador County.
The Chinese business area in the town of Amador was at the end of Hotel Alley. It consisted of
one laundry. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1912.
Amador County Museum, Amador County.
Amador County Museum is located at 225 Church Street in the City of Jackson. The museum
maintains exhibits of Chinese artifacts.
Buena Vista Store, Amador County.
Buena Vista Store was originally built in 1850 in the community ofLancha Plana. The structure,
made of stones, was part of the Lancha Plana Chinatown, located between Main Street and the
Mokelumne River
. When Chinese miners discovered gold beneath its foundation, they made an
agreement with the building owner to relocate it six mi
les north to Buena Vista. Carrying the
stones one at a time, the miners rebuilt it between Buena Vista Road and the road from
Camanche Lake to Lake Amador near the town of lone. See Lanca Plana Chinatown, Amador
County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979a
.
Butte Store, Amador County.
Butte Store, about three miles south of Jackson on Highway 49, is the only remaining structure
of Butte City and its large Chinatown. The building was constructed by Chinese and features
stones and iron shutters from China. It is California Historical Landmark No. 39. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation, 1990: 12.
Chew Kee Store, Amador County.
Chew Kee Store, originally an herb shop, was constructed in 1850. It was built on West Main
Street, communit
y of Fiddletown, using the rammed earth technique that dates to 1500 B.C. in
China. The technique involves packing mud between wooden forms until it becomes as hard as
stone. Being prone to dissolve in the rain, the exterior walls are usually covered with wood, as
was done with the Chew Kee Store. The store was the home of Fong Chow You (Jimmy Chow),
the last descendant of the original Chinese of Fiddletown. He died in 1965 and is buried nearby.
Presently the structure is a museum. See Fiddletown Chinatown, Amador County. Reference:
Lew 1984: 9; Lew 1977: 10; Wey 1977: 12: Wey 1988: 109-110; Zorbas 1997: 30,98-100. Photo.
China City, Amador County.
China City, an early Chinatown was about one mile above Whites Bar on the Mokelumne River in an area rich in placer gold. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 71.
China Graveyard, Amador County.
China Graveyard is near Church Street, City of Jackson. In operation between 1850 and 1910,
the cemetery was the site for the interment of deceased Chinese. Presently
, the site is occupied
by city
-owned buildings. See Jackson Chinatown, Amador County. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1983a
.
China Graveyard Road, Amador County.
China Graveyard Road has an east-west orientation, connecting Jackson Gate Road and New
York Ranch Road in the Cit
y of Jackson. It was the approach to China Graveyard. See China
Graveyard
, Amador County. Reference: Compass Maps 1997.
China Gulch, Amador County.
(1) China Gulch was the site of a large Chinatown that flooded when Camanche Reservoir was
created. The reservoir itself was originally a large open pit mine. See Little China Gulch,
Amador County. Reference: Un
ited States Geological Survey 1962c.
(2) China Gulch is one and three-quarter miles long with an intermittent stream that flows north
to south just north of Butte City
.It is about three miles northwest of Mokelumne Hill. See China
Gulch Hill
, Amador County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1949d.
China Gulch Hill, Amador County.
China Gulch Hill, near Volcano, was a hydraulic mining operation that was active in the 1860's.
Its yield was moderate and soon abandoned
. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 71.
China Gulch Trail, Amador County.
China Gulch Trail in the community of Sutter Creek has an east-west orientation. Located in a
gold mining area
, the road is west of Hanford Street off Amador Trail. Reference: Compass
 Maps 1997.

China Street, Amador County. 
China Street in the community of Drytown parallels Main Street and connects Highway 49 and
Main Street
. China Street formed the center of Drytown Chinatown. See Drytown Chinatown,
Amador County. Reference
: Compass Maps 1997.

Chinese Adobe Building, Amador County.

Built in 1850 on West Main Street in the community of Fiddletown, the large structure (24 x 27
feet) is made of adobe bricks. Of note is its compacted earth ceiling
. It is one of the last buildings
of Fiddletown Chinatown. See Fiddletown Chinatown
, Amador County. Reference: Office of
Historic Preservation 1978a
.

Chinese Brick Store, Amador County.

Built in 1850 at West Main Street in Fiddletown, Chinese Brick Store is a two story brick-
covered, stone-walled store. The walls consists of schist-mud lime mortar. It is one of th
e few
remaining structures of Fiddletown Chinatown. See Fiddleto
wn Chinatown, Amador County.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1978b.

Chinese Gambling House, Amador County.

Chinese Gambling House on West Main Street in Fiddletown dates to 1855. Its longevity may
be attributed to its brick and stone construction=resistance to fire was an important consideration
in the early days. See Fiddletown Chinatown, Amador County. Reference: Nadeau 1992: 83.

Drytown Chinatown, Amador County.

Drytown Chinatown, centered around China Street, was in the community of Drytown. It was
a booming place that lasted as long as the gold in the nearby area
. See China Street, Amador
County. Reference: Zorbas 1997: 95.

Fiddletown Chinatown, Amador County.

Fiddletown Chinatown covered most of the southwest portion of Fiddletown with West Main
Street as its center. By 1880
, about 45 percent of Fiddletown's population was Chinese with one-
half working as miners. Presently
, there are four buildings associated with the Chinese. The state
has identified all of the structures as historically sign
ificant. The two that are well preserved and
restored are the Chew Kee Herb Store and Chinese Gambling House. The other two
, known
simply as the Chinese brick store and Chinese adobe building, are to be renovated
. See Chew
Kee Herb Store
, Amador County; Chinese Adobe Building, Amador County; Chinese Brick
Store, Amador County; Chinese Gambling House
. Reference: Nadeau 1992: 83; Zorbas 1997:
30, 101
.
Fiddletown Chinese Cemetery, Amador County.

Fiddletown Chinese Cemetery was located on the edge of Fiddletown. It was abandoned in 1917
when the last occupant was disinterred
. See Fiddletown Chinatown, Amador County. Reference:Zorbas 1997: 30, 101Maps 1997.

lone Chinese Business Area, Amador County.

The Chinese business area in the town of Ione was on the west side of Preston Avenue next to Sutter Creek. In 1898, it had one laundry and one dwelling. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1898a.

Jackson Chinatown, Amador County.

Jackson Chinatown was on Main Street between California and Fletcher Alley in the City of Jackson. Dating from the 1850s, much of it was destroyed by a flood on Jackson Creek in 1878. Presently, it is the site of a parking lot. See China Graveyard, Amador County; Jackson Chinatown Joss House, Amador County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1983b.

Jackson Chinatown Joss House, Amador County.

Jackson Chinatown Joss House in the City of Jackson was located west of Main Street. A flood in 1878 destroyed the structure and it was rebuilt on the same site around 1890. By 1912, it was no longer in use. See Jackson Chinatown, Amador County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1983b.

Lancha Plana Chinatown, Amador County.

Lancha Plana Chinatown was the home of several hundred Chinese miners between 1855 and
1860
. See Buena Vista Store, Amador County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979b.

Little China Gulch, Amador County.

This stream and valley is due west of China Gulch and is two and one-half miles in length. When
Camanche Reservoir filled with water, Little China Gulch flooded about one-quarter mile up the
valley
, while China Gulch was completely inundated. See China Gulch, Amador County.
Reference: United States Geological Survey 1962c.

Ming's Store, Amador County.
Ming's Store  was in the town of Plymouth. The building that housed the store was built in 1880.
See Plymouth
 Chinatown, Amador County.

Plymouth Chinatown, Amador County.

Plymouth Chinatown was in the community of Plymouth in the 1890's. Reference: Zorbas 1997:
95.

Sing Kee Store, Amador County.

Sing Kee Store was in the town of Volcano. The store, on Main Street, was reportedly built in
1854
. See Volcano Chinatown, Amador County.

Volcano Chinatown, Amador County.

Volcano Chinatown supplied the Chinese laborers who worked in the gold mines of the area.
Volcano was one of the first placer gold sites in Amador County with the initial disco
very
occurring in 1849. Once the placer deposits were exhausted, tunnel and shaft mining became
important. By 1855
, the area was characterized by its hydraulic mining. Reference: Nadeau 1992:
78-83

Butte County
Ah Moon Bar, Butte County.
Ah Moon Bar was on the North Fork of the Feather River near Big Bend. The Chinese were
thought to have
worked the placer gold deposit. Reference: Dunn 1977: 2; Gudde and Gudde
1975: 1
4.
Butte County Rock Fences, Butte County.
Butte County has a network of stone fences often considered to have been built by Chinese. The
fences usua
lly enclose foothill grazing land although they could have other purposes. Building
of a fence involved labore
rs carrying stones in baskets attached to wooden yokes slung their 
shoulders to the building site. The stones were then stacked one atop another to a height of 
several feet. This meant a fence thickness of two or more feet. One such fence was constructed 
by the Chinese on the northwest side of Hell Town along Butte Creek Canyon. Its purpose was to
separate them from the non-Chinese of the town. The rock fences are now protected by county
statutes. See Bok Kai Chinese Wall Memorial, Yuba County; Great Wall of China, Mariposa

County; Helltown China Town, Butte County. Reference: Book 1976: 18,44. 
Centerville China Town, Butte County.
There was a large settlement of Chinese in Centerville that formed China Town, officially
spe
lled as two words. Centerville was once known as Diamondville. This is of note because
Di
amondville laws of 1875 stated that no Chinese could mine on Butte Creek above the head of
the Diamond
ville Ditch or hold claims above that point. Reference: Dunn 1977: 23.
Chico MuseumButte County.
Chico Museum at 14Salem StreetCitof Chicohas the altar from a temple in the Chico New Chinatown on permanendisplaySee Chico New Chinatown, Butte County.
Chico New Chinatown, Butte County.
Chico New Chinatown was located on Main Street between Seventh Street and Ninth Street in
the City of Chico. It resulted from the crowded conditions in Chico Old Chinatown. Chico New
Chinato
wn had three laundries, a school, joss house and shirt factory by 1884. The new
se
ttlement was particularly notable because of the attempts to destroy it. A widespread economic
dep
ression caused many non-Chinese to believe that the Chinese were taking jobs away from
them
. Anti-Chinese activities increased to the point of two separate arson attempts, the killing
of four Chinese and the
wounding of two others. Twelve non-Chinese were arrested with four
be
ing sentenced to prison for their role in the disturbances. All evidence of Chico New
China
town was gone by 1974. See Chico Old Chinatown, Butte County. Reference: Pricer 1996:
31,37-38; McGowan 1961: 325-326; Sanborn Insurance Map 1884a.
Chico Old Chinatown, Butte County.
Chico Old Chinatown was located on Flume Street between East Fifth Street and East Sixth
Street in the City of Chico by about 1865. The structures of Chico Old Chinatown were built
li
terally touching one another. This meant that there was no room for connecting stairs or
hallways. As a result, the buildings were connected through their basements by portals. Initially the portals or tunnels were not used as living space, merely passage ways. A continued increase 
in the population of Chico Old Chinatown apparently resulted in the tunnels becoming living
quarters. Some overcrowding was alleviated by the development of Chico New Chinatown. See
Chico New Chinatown
, Butte County. Reference: Pricer 1996: 30-31

China Gulch, Butte County.
The stream that flows through China Gulch empties into North Fork of the Feather River.
Reference
: Dunn 1977: 23; United States Geological Survey 1970.

China Switch Station, Butte County.
China Switch Station, Chico Creek, is a flume-tender station on the Sierra Flume and Lumber
Company flume. The tender would make sure that the logs were moving properly as well as
make repairs to the flume. Reference: Dunn 1977: 23.

China Wall, Butte County.
Built by Chinese laborers in 1892, China wall was also known as McLaughlin Wall, McLaughlin
being the one who had it built. The structure is six to seven miles in length and runs along the
northeast bank of the Feather Ri
ver. Of stone masonry construction, in places it is 20 feet high
with a base of 20 feet. The top is from six to eight feet in width. The wall was used to divert the
flow of the Feather River so gold could be dredged from its bed
. Unknown to McLaughlin, the
miners of 1849 had already removed all the gold from the stream bed using a similar strategy
.
China Wall was submerged when the Oroville Dam was build. Today, portions of the wall are
visible only when the dam's water level is ver
y low. Reference: Talbitzer: 19, 77-79.

Chinees Camp, Butte County.
This is an unusual spelling for Chinese Camp in the community of Helltown. Eventually, it
officially became Helltown China Town. See Helltown China Town
, Butte County; Chinese
Camp, Butte County. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 71.
Chinese Camp, Butte County.
This was an alternate name for Helltown China Town, Butte County. See Helltown China Town
Butte County. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 71.

Diamondville Chinese Cemetery, Butte County.
Originally known as Rich Bar and later Goatville, the town took the name Diamondville after
James Diamond
. The Diamondville name dates to at least 1877. Nearby, an abandoned Chinese
cemetery is evident. See Centerville China Town, Butte County. Reference: Dunn 1977: 32.

East China Point, Butte County.
East China Point is a ridge that runs in a northeast-southwest direction and is about one mile in length.
Reference: United States Geological Surve
y 1980.

Gibsonville Chinatown, Butte County.
Gibsonville Chinatown was located at the north end of Main Street on a side street to the east
in the community of Gibsonville. Gibsonville Chinatown contained residences, a bunk house and store. The Chinese residents worked primarily in the mines of the area. The site was eventually buried by tailings from the hydraulic mining of Whisky Flat and Whiskey Diggings. ReferencePricer 1996: 57. 

Oroville Chinatown, Butte County.
Oroville Chinatown in the City of Oroville was along Broderick Street on the south side of the
Feather River. In 1884, there was one laundry, one restaurant
, one gambling house, five stores,
a joss house and about twenty dwellings. By 1890, it had expanded to both sides of Broderick
Street and included two more joss houses, a theater, another laundry and three more dwellings.
It continued to grow, adding more dwellings and a Chinese Masonic Hall in 1902. See Oroville
Cemetery, Butte County; Oroville Chinese Temple, Butte County. Reference
: Sanborn Insurance
Map 1884b, 1890b, 1902a.

Oroville Chinese Cemetery, Butte County.
Oroville Chinese Cemetery is located on Feather River Highway about eight-tenths of a mile
south of Oro Dam Boulevard in the City of Oroville. It is surrounded on three sides by gravel
tailings from nearby mining. As was common in the early days, the cemetery was for temporary
interment only
. Accordingly, only a few Chinese remain interred today. Each grave was
originally covered by a slab of white granite and outlined with red bricks bearing Chinese
writing. A second cemetery across the street acted as a holding area when the main one was at
capacity. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1976: 192; Pricer 1996: 47-48.
Oroville Chinese Temple, Butte County.
Oroville Chinese Temple is actually Liet Sheng Kong, the Temple of Assorted Deities. It is
located on the bank of the Feather River in the City of Oroville. Built in 1863, it consisted of a
temple
, a storehouse and a theater. Additional temples and buildings were added through the
years until a flood in 1907 caused considerable damage. The property was given to the city in
1937 and opened to the public in 1949 after restoration work by community members. Today
,
one finds the main temple (built for Taoists in 1863), the Moon Temple (constructed for
Buddhists in 1868) and the Chan Room for Confucians (built in 1874). Newer facilities include
a display hall
, memorial pavilion, garden courtyard and reconstructed living quarters of a
Chinese miner
, circa the 1800's. The temple complex is California Historical Landmark No. 770
and is on the National Register of Historic Places. See Oroville Chinatown, Butte County.
Reference: "Chinese Temple...
"; "Guide ..."; Office of Historic Preservation 1976.
Patrick Place, Butte County.
Patrick Place was south of the City of Chico on Durham Road. A site of Chinese vegetable
farming, it provided produce to the nearby city
. The garden was owned communally by as many
as 40-60 Chinese who leased the land. It continued into the early 1900's. Reference: Pricey 1996:
39.
Sing Kee Store, Butte County.
Sing Kee Store was located in the community of Clipper Mills. Apparently, it was a general
merchandise store providing goods to the Chinese laborers and miners of the Marysville-La Porte
area in the 1890's. Reference: Pricey 1996: 51.
South China Mountain, Butte County.
South China Mountain is about 17 miles southeast of the community of Etna and is about one
mile south of China Mountain. It is 8
,200 feet above sea level. Reference: United States
Geological Survey 1955.
Susanville Chinatown, Butte County.
Susanville Chinatown in the community of Susanville had a large Chinese population through
the 1880s and 1890s. It contained numerous residences and a joss house. The residents worked
as laborers and miners. Reference: Pricer 1996: 52.

West China Point, Butte County. 
West China Point is located about one and one-half miles from Stirling City. The Point is actually a ridge that extends in a southwest manner for about one mile. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1979c.


Calaveras County

Angels Camp Chinatown, Calaveras County.
Located between the Old Angels Hotel and Angels Creek, Angels Camp Chinatown covered
almost one square block of
Angels Camp from 1850-1860. It was an important source of supplies and a place of social interaction for the Chinese who worked in the surrounding gold fields. By 1874, the Chinatown's population was about 200. See Angels Camp Chinatown Road, Calaveras County; China Gulch, Calaveras County. Reference: Williams 1971: 45.

Calaveras County Historical Museum, Calaveras County.

Calaveras County Historical Museum at 30 North Main Street in the town of San Andreas has
a permanent exhibit of artifacts
and photographs related to the Chinese of the area.

Camanche Chinatown, Calaveras County.
The continuous problem of fire and the wooden buildings of Chinatown is commemorated in
Camanche. A plaque on the site states, "Once cal
led Limerick, the town became Camanche (after Camanche, Iowa) in 1849. Rich mining at nearby Cat Camp, Poverty Bar and Sand Hill brought its population to a peak of 1,500. Mokelumne River water was brought in by Lancha Plana and Poverty Bar Ditch. A fire on June 21, 1873, destroyed Camanche's large Chinatown. Camanche is now inundated by Camanche Reservoir." It is California Historic Landmark No. 254. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1990: 21.


Chinatown Road, Calaveras County.
By 1874, a Chinese by the name of Sam Choy owned considerable land in Angels Camp
Chinatown. The Chinatown was centered on a dirt road that became known as Chinatown Road
. See Angels Camp Chinatown, Calaveras County; Sam Choy Brick Store, Calaveras County.. Reference: Las Calaveras 1973: 18.

China Bar, Calaveras County.
China Bar, a placer gold site, was worked by early Chinese miners. It is on a map dated 1853 that shows the Calaveras River near the town of San Andreas. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 70.

China Flat, Calaveras County.

China Flat was the site of a large Chinatown on the Mokelumne River near Campo Seco. The
last rema
ins were submerged beneath the waters of the Camanche Dam, constructed in 1963.

China Gulch, Calaveras County.

(1) Approximately 100 Chinese lived in China Gulch just above the town of Angels Camp by
1851
. As the town grew, it encompassed China Gulch with tents being replaced by wooden
buildings and an adobe structure. It soon became identified as
Angels Camp Chinatown. See
Angels Camp Chinatown
, Calaveras County. Reference: Leonard 1963: 1.

(2) Avenue K of the community of Mokelurnne Hill was renamed China Gulch in 1962. This was done to memorialize Mokelumne Hill Chinatown. See Mokelumne Hill Chinatown, Calaveras County. Reference: Garamendi 1963: 4.

China Spring, Calaveras County.

China Spring was the location of a large settlement of Chinese that developed during the gold
mining days
. They lived along the banks of the spring. The site is behind the historical marker
in the town of Rail Road Flat. Reference: Buchanan 1963
: 63.

China Street, Calaveras County.

China Street was the main street of San Andreas Chinatown in the town of San Andreas. It was
so named because it was considered the
"poor man's version of today's Grant Avenue of San
Francisco
." See San Andreas Chinatown, Calaveras County. Reference: Las Calaveras 1973: 13.

China Trail, Calaveras County.
China Trail was a road that connected San Andreas and San Antone Ridge. It was used by
everyone, notably the Chinese, between 1870 and the 1880's. Reference: Johnson 1968: 2.

Chinese Gardens, Calaveras County.

Chinese Gardens was a large vegetable farm operated by a Chinese. It was a short distance from the town of Cave City, across from O'Neals Creek--no doubt the source of water for the garden. The produce was sold in Cave City and the surrounding area. Reference: Smith 1964: 2.

Double Springs Courthouse, Calaveras County.

The courthouse is the earliest example of a prefabricated building from China that is still
standing. It is made of wood from the camphor tree
, pre-cut in China and shipped to California.
It was assembled in the town of Double Springs in 1850. Reference
: Hoover 1966: 41-42.

Jenny Lind, Calaveras County.

California commemorated the Chinese presence in the community of Jenny Lind with a plaque
that states, " Jenny Lind, located on the north bank of the Calaveras River
, was a placer mining
town as early as 1849. Most of the placer mining was done along the hillsides above the river
;
later the river was mined with dredgers. In 1864 the population was said to be 400, half of them Chinese." Jenny Lind is California Historic Landmark No. 266. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1990: 23.

Mokelumne Hill Chinatown, Calaveras County.

Mokelumne Hill Chinatown in the town of Mokelumne Hill was in a ravine between the Leger
Hotel and Mokelumne Creek. It extended from East Center Street
, south along Avenue K to Lafayette Street. By 1890, there were two laundries, one store, a joss house and about 25 dwellings; Many of its buildings were made of adobe and only ruins were apparent by 1930. See China Gulch, Mokelumne Hill, Calaveras County. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1890a; Williams 1971: 45.
San Andreas Chinatown, Calaveras County.
San Andreas Chinatown was similar to many other Chinatowns in the Mother Lode County. It
developed early, about 1855, in the town of San Andreas along what became known as China
Street
. It provided for the social and cultural needs of the Chinese workers. See China Street,
Calaveras County. Reference: Wells 1962: 5

Sam Choy Brick Store, Calaveras County.
Sam Choy Brick Store is on Bird Way, City of Angeles Camp. Built in 1860, it featured metal shutters on doors and windows, a common feature on fire-resistant structures at that time. Choy occupied the building until 1892. He was a family man, merchant, and labor contractor. The store is on the National Registry of Historic Places. Reference: "Choy, Sam Brick Store," 1984.


Colusa County

Colusa Chinatown District, Colusa County.
Colusa Chinatown District is located on Main Street near 8th Street, City of Colusa. A plaque erected by Sam Brannan Chapter #1004, E. Clampus Vitus, states  "In the 1850s, Chinese came to California, a land they called Gum Shan, meaning Mountain of Gold, for the same reason as other nationalities: to seek their fortune. As the placer gold played out, Chinese took jobs building railroads, dams, levees, and highways. In Chinatown, people could come together for comfort, safety, and religious purposes, free from the persecution to which they were accustomed. Typically, families would conduct business and live in the same building. At one time, a network of tunnels once connected the buildings to each other. This area remains a link to the Chinese presence and cultural heritage of the 19th & 20th centuries."
  
                                                          EI Dorado County
 China Bar, EI Dorado County.
China Bar was the site of a placer gold deposit seemingly worked by Chinese. The placename appeared in a mining report dated 1856 that pertained to the South Fork of the American River, about eight miles from Chile Bar. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 70.
China Creek, EI Dorado County.
China Creek is about two and one-half miles in length and flows from the nearby community of Camino in a southwest direction, eventually joining Weber Creek. Chinese placer miners worked the area as evidenced by the placer mines in the vicinity. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1952a.
China Diggins Road, EI Dorado County.
China Diggins Road is between the towns of Clarksville and Latrobe, east of Ryan Ranch Road and between Strap Miner Creek and Plunkett Creek. It is located in one of the rich mining areas of the Gold Country. Reference: Compass Maps 1994.
China Flat, EI Dorado County.
(1) Located on Silver Fork Road about three miles from its junction with the American River,
China Flat is where Chinese placer miners extensively worked the river terrace. Today, it is a
concessionaire
-operated campground within the EI Dorado National Forest. Reference: National Forest Service; United States Geological Survey 1967.
(2) Chinese miners worked the one-half mile wide river terrace called China Flat. It extends on
both sides of the north-flowing Rubicon River in Rockbound Valley
, itself a valley carved by
glaciers. China Flat is approximately 7
,600 feet above sea level. Reference: United States
Geological Survey 1969.
China Garden Court, EI Dorado County.
China Garden Court is at the end of China Garden Road, community of Diamond Springs. The
street is between Missouri Flat Road and Diamond Road on the north side of Pleasant Valley
Road. See China Garden Road, EI Dorado Count
y. Reference: Compass Maps 1995.


China Garden Road, El Dorado County
China Garden Road has a north-south orientation and is located between the Southern Pacific
Railroad tracks and Pleasant Valley Road in the community of Diamond Springs. See China
Garden Court, El Dorado County. Reference: Compass Maps 1995.

China Hill, El Dorado County.
China Hill is in the town of Auburn. It was a place of Chinese residences and a joss house, being
notable because of an 1855 newspaper account stating that a Chinese theater was established
there. Reference: Towle 1994: 67.
China Hill Road, El Dorado County.
China Hill Road is due west of the community of Logtown and parallels Highway 49 on its west
side. The road is within a very productive area of the Gold Country and leads to China Mountain. See China Mountain
, El Dorado County. Reference: Compass Maps 1994.
China Mountain, El Dorado County.
China Mountain lies between Slate Creek and Crystal Boulevard, northwest of the community
of Nashville on Highway 49. It is 1,734 feet above sea level in a rich gold-bearing region of the
Sierra Nevada Mountains. See China Hill Road
, El Dorado County. Reference: Compass Maps
1994
.
Coloma Chinatown, EI Dorado County.

Coloma Chinatown is located within Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park. Much of
Coloma Chinatown was destroyed when a dispute over a mining claim in 1861 resulted in a mob
of non-Chinese going on a rampage
, beating and killing several Chinese. Sixteen of the rioters
were arrested, convicted, fined and jailed. Although Coloma Chinatown burned in 1880,
evidence of its existence is found in the form of the Wan Lee and Wah Hop general merchandise stores. The' ruins of a joss house are also apparent as are many of the Tree of Heaven. See Wah Lee Store, Coloma County; Wo Hop Store, El Dorado County. Reference: Lew 1984: 10; Lew 1977: 11; Office of Historic Preservation 1979d; Wells 1962: 4.
EI Dorado County Historical Museum, EI Dorado County.
El Dorado County Historical Museum at 104 Placerville Drive, City of Placerville, has Chinese
artifacts on display.
Fanny Creek Chinese Cemetery, EI Dorado County.
Fanny Creek Chinese Cemetery is three-quarters of a mile due south of China Mountain. Being
near the mountain and creek, the site's feng shui makes for a proper burial place. See China
Mountain, EI Dorado County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1949c.
  Lotus, EI Dorado County.                                                                                
Lotus is a small community on Highway 49. Its name suggests a relationship between the town
and the Chinese. Yet, a closer look shows it was originally known as Marshall, being named after
James W. Marshall in 1849. The name was changed in 1850 to Uniontown in honor of California
becoming a part of the United States. To avoid confusion with a community in Humboldt County
that had earlier been named Unionville, the United States Postal Service changed the town's
name to Lotus
. Reference: Hoover 1990: 82.
Shanghai Way, EI Dorado County.
Shanghai Way parallels Coloma Road (Highway 49) in the town of Placerville between
Combellak Road and Baker Road. There has been gold mining throughout the area. Reference:
Compass Maps 1995.
Wah Hop Store, EI Dorado County.
Wah Hop Store was built in 1851 on Main Street in the community of Coloma and was a part
of Coloma Chinatown. The structure is made of local rock with adobe mortar. The store
specialized in herbs and dry goods while acting as a message center and post office
. Now
restored, the building was reopened to the public in 1958 and is part of the Marshall Gold
Discovery State Historic Park. See Coloma Chinatown
, EI Dorado County; Wan Lee Store, EI
Dorado County
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979d; Website 1999.
Wan Lee Store, El Dorado County.

Wan Lee Store is one of the last reminders of Coloma Chinatown in the community of Coloma.
Located near Wah Hop Store on Main Street, the store sold general merchandise. It began in
1860 when Wan Lee entered into a lease agreement with the building's owner. Today
, the store
houses an exhibit of gold mining techniques and is part of Marshall Gold Discovery State
Historic Park. See Coloma Chinatown, EI Dorado County; Wah Hop Store, El Dorado County
.
Reference: Lew 1977: 11.


Madera County
Borden Chinatown, Madera County.
Borden Chinatown had about 1,500 Chinese who arrived in the community of Borden in
the 1870's. Most were railroad laborers. Borden Chinatown started to decline when a great
number of Chinese left to build a flume near the town of Madera. By the mid-twentieth century,
only a few Chinese remained, mostly of Fayuan origin. See Madera Chinatown, Madera County.
Reference: Bulletin 1992: 2
.
Chew Grade, Madera County.
Chew Grade was a section of a flume that passed over land leased to Ah Chew, a Chinese tenant
farmer. This section of the flume was used to move partially-milled timber from the Madera-
Sugar Pine sawmill to Salt Springs, the first stop on the trip to the town of Madera. The sawmill
started in 1900 and employed many Chinese workers until 1918, when most of them were
replaced by laborers from other ethnic groups. See Sugar Pine Chinatown, Madera County
.
Reference: Johnston 1968: 35.
China Creek, Madera County.
(1) China Creek, near Oakhurst, is about five and one-half miles in length and flows into the
Fresno River. It is in the Southern Mines Region. Chinese miners moved from the Northern
Mines Region southward as the gold disappeared
. The first strikes were in places such as
Oakhurst, Coarse Gold Creek, Grub Gulch and Fine Gold Creek
. In fact, the Chinese were
panning for gold at Coarse Gold in 1854. The lesser amounts of gold in the southern portion
caused a continual movement southward into the Kern River/Tehachapi area. Reference:
Theodoratus 1984: 277-278.
(2) China Creek is a three-mile long stream flowing east to west and is about three miles west
of Bass Lake in the Sierra National Forest
. There is evidence of mining and timber cutting in the
area
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1990a.
China Creek Road, Madera County.
China Creek Road is located in the area of Fresno Flats and has a north-south orientation. It ends
at Crane Valley Road. China Creek Road crosses China Creek in its southerly portion. See (1) China
Creek,
 Madera County. Reference: Compass Maps 1994. 
China Garden, Madera County.
China Garden is a one-half mile wide by one-mile long area on the south side of the Fresno River
northeast of Madera Lake. The good river-deposited soil, supply of fresh water, an unimproved
dirt
road that circles the area and the placename suggests that the area may well have been a
vegetable garden operated by Chinese. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1962b.
China Slough, Madera County.

China Slough is a three-mile long intermittent stream paralleling the Fresno River just south of
China Garden. See China Garden, Madera County. Reference: United States Geological Survey
1962b. 

China Wells, Madera County.
China Wells is located 16 miles from the community of Sugar Pine. It is next to the flume used
to move timber from the Sugar Pine mill and was a favorite site for flume rides. When
the flume was not being used to move timber
, people traveled down it in a flume boat, often
reaching speeds of 50 miles per hour
. Reference: Johnston 1968: 37, 53; United States
Geological Sur
vey 1990b.
Lower China Crossing, Madera County.
This may have been an early name for what became Lower China Store. See Lower China Store,
Madera Count
y.
Lower China Store, Madera County.
Lower China Store in Hidden Valley, was in operation from the 1860's to 1885. Owned by Ah
Sun
, the adobe structure was expanded by the addition of more rooms and a blacksmith shop.
Ah Sun and the store served the needs of the Chinese
, Native Americans and Anglo settlers in
the gold fields of the Southern Mines
. Reference: Langenwalter 1980: 103.
Madera Chinatown, Madera County.
Madera Chinatown, town of Madera, became a reality when many Chinese laborers relocated
from Borden Chinatown
. The move was prompted by the need for laborers for the construction
of a flume that was 54 miles long. The flume was used to bring logs do
wn from the Sierras. See Chew
Grade, Madera County; China Wells, Madera County; Sugar Pine Chinatown, Madera County.
Reference: Bulletin 1992: 2.
Sing Peak, Madera County.
Sing Peak, named in 1899, honors Tie Sing, a Chinese cook with the United States Geological
Sur
vey. He worked for the Survey from 1888 until 1918 when he was killed in an accident in the
field. The peak e
xtends 10,522 feet above sea level and is part of the boundary between
Yosem
ite National Park and the Sierra National Forest. Reference: Browning 1986: 20l.
Spangle Gold Creek Chinatown, Madera County.
Spangle Gold Creek Chinatown had a Chinese population of about 2,000 in the late 1860's. The
communit
y was located on the creek near where it flows into the Fresno River, about five miles
west of Coarse Gold. Like the gold, Spangle Gold Creek Chinatown has long since disappeared.
Reference: Theodoratus 1984: 278.
Sugar Pine Chinatown, Madera County.

Sugar Pine Chinatown was located within the company town of Sugar Pine. Sugar Pine itself was
o
wned and operated by the Madera Sugar Pine Company. Hundreds of workers lived in the larger
to
wn with the Chinese establishing a living area next to it. The Chinatown was in existence from
the la
te 1800's to 1933 when the company closed the entire operation because of the Great
Depression
. Reference: Theodoratus 1984: 303-304


Mariposa County

Bear Valley Chinese, Mariposa County.

Located on present-day Highway 49, Bear Valley is another reminder of the very early Chinese
presence in the Gold C
ountry. A plaque placed by Matuca Chapter 1849 ofE. Clampus Vitus in
1985 states
, "First caIIed Johnsonville, Bear Valley had a large population that included Chinese,
Cornish and Mexicans. During 1850-60 when Col. John C. Fremont's Ride Tree and Josephine
Mines were producing, Fremont
's elegant hotel, Oso House, was built with lumber brought
around the Horn. It no longer stands
. After fire in 1888, structures were rebuilt. Some still
standing are Bon Ton Saloon
, Trabucco Store, Odd Fellows Hall, schoolhouse, and remains of
the jail
. All reminders of Bear Valley's colorful past." Bear Valley is California Historic
Landmark No
. 331. Reference: Johnson 1995: 14.

China Bar, Mariposa County.

China Bar is at the upper end of Mammoth Pool near the North Fork of the San Joaquin River
inlet in the Sierra National Forest
. Located a little south of the Mother Lode, the area saw limited
prospecting and mining
. Still, a map dated 1887 depicts a mine in the area. It is thought that the
placename memorializes a Chinese
who was deliberately killed while crossing the pool. His boat
was capsized with the intent of steal
ing his claim. Reference: Popelish 1995.

China Flat, Mariposa County.

China Flat is a broad, flat surface next to Jordan Creek in an area with many mines and tailings.

It is two miles south-southeast of the Groverland Ranger Station on Big Oak Flat Road in the
Stanislaus National Forest 
Stanislaus National Forest. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1949b.

China Gulch, Mariposa County.

China Gulch is about four miles east of the town of Catheys Valley. It is a three and three-quarter
mile long seasonal stream that joins Agua Fria Creek
. Evidence of mining (shafts, tailings) and
kilns are f
ounthroughout the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1962a.

China Meadow, Mariposa County.

China Meadow is north of Benedict Meadow along the western edge of the Minaret District of the Sierra National ForestChina Meadow is a broad, open area within the forest and the home of the Chinese who worked at the saw mill across the road. The name dates from around 1900-1901. Reference: Popelish 1995.

Chinatown Street, Mariposa County.

Chinatown Street in the community of Coulterville extends from Greeley Hill Road to Kow
Street
. It was the primary street of Coulterville Chinatown. See Coulterville Chinatown,
Mariposa Count
y; Kow Street, Mariposa County. Reference: Compass Maps 1994.

Chinese Cemetery, Mariposa County.

Chinese Cemetery is also known as Ching Cemetery. See Ching Cemetery, Mariposa County.

Chinese Gulch, Mariposa County.
Chinese Gulch is an intermittent stream that flows northeast to southeast into Indian Gulch. It
is about one-half mile southeast of Dogtown Road. There has been considerable mining activity
in the area
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1987.
Ching Cemetery, Mariposa County.
Ching Cemetery is located on Main Street in the community of Coulterville across from
Coulterville Chinatown. Established around 1860, a large part of it was destro
yed when a sewer
ditch was dug through the area. Ching Cemetery is sometime referred to simply as Chinese
Cemetery. See Coulterville Chinatown
, Mariposa County. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1982a
.
Coulterville Chinatown, Mariposa County.
Coulterville Chinatown was located on the upper end of Main Street in Coulterville and is
presently bounded by Main Street
, Kow Street and Highway 120. Dating to the early 1850's, the
Chinese who lived there comprised 20 percent of the total population (1
,000 Chinese out of
5
,000 non-Chinese). See Kow Street, Mariposa County; Sun Family House, Mariposa County;
Sun Sun Wo General Store
, Mariposa County. Reference: Nadeau 1992: 129.
Great Wall of China, Mariposa County.
The Great Wall of China, near the town of Mariposa, is four miles long, four feet high and two
f
eet wide. The dry stack wall enclosed 640 acres of the Quick Ranch. It is the most completely documented of the Chinese-built stone fences in the state. This results from the ranch being in the same family, the Quick family, since its beginning in 1859. Records maintained by the family show the hiring of a Chinese foreman and Chinese workers for the construction of the fence. The workers received 25 cents per day for one and one-half rods (24 3/4 feet) of fence. The foreman received $1.75 for every rod (16 1/2 feet). Total cost of the fence was $6,000. See Bok Kai Chinese Wall Memorial, Yuba County; Great Wall of China, Butte County; Butte County Rock Fences, Butte County. Reference: Wey 1988: 133-134.
Hornitos Chinatown, Mariposa County.
Located on the road leading north out of Hornitos, Hornitos Chinatown was one block north of
the plaza and dates to 1852. Like others, Hornitos Chinatown consisted of wooden buildings.
The
y burned by accident and not rebuilt. Reference: Williams 1971: 41, 47.
Kow Street, Mariposa County.
Kow Street in the community of Coulterville, was named in honor of Sun Kow, a well-known
local Chinese businessman. The street forms the northeast border of Coulterville Chinatown. See
Coulterville Chinatown, Mariposa County; Sun Family House
, Mariposa County. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1982b.
Mariposa Museum, Mariposa County.
Mariposa Museum at 5119 Jessie Street, City of Mariposa, has Chinese artifacts and historical
photographs of the Chinese on display.

 Mormon Bar, Mariposa County.

The Chinese' ability to rework the gold deposits abandoned by non-Chinese is pointed out at
Mormon Bar. There, a plaque states, "Mormon Bar was first mined in 1849 by members of the
Mormon Battalion. They
, however, stayed only a short time and their places were taken at once
by other miners. Later, thousands of Chinese worked the same ground over again." It is
California Historical Landmark No. 323. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation
, 1990: 109.

Pioneer History Center, Mariposa County.

Pioneer History Center is in Wawona, Yosemite Valley. It was originally the two-story home of
Jerimaha and May Hodgdon. Constructed in 1889
, the house was built by Ah Hoy and a Mr.
Babcock
. The building displays construction practices used in China in the 1800's. Ah Hoy
worked for the Hodgdon family from the 1870's to the 1890's
. Reference: Born 1995.

Sun Family House, Mariposa County.

Sun Family House was built about 1903 at the comer of Kow Street and Highway J20 in
Coulterville Chinatown in the community of Coulterville. One of the last three buildings in
Coulterville Chinatown, it was the residence of Sun Kow
, the last owner of the Sun Sun Wo
General Store. See Coulterville Chinatown
, Mariposa County; Kow Street, Mariposa County;
Sun Sun Wo General Store, Mariposa County. Reference: Office of Historic Preser
vation 1982b.

Sun Sun Wo General Store, Mariposa County.

Built with adobe bricks in 1851, the store was at the upper end of Main Street within Coulterville Chinatown in the community of Coulterville. It served the Chinese who worked in the mines, on the ranches and businesses of Yosemite Valley. See Coulterville Chinatown, Mariposa County. Reference: Lew 1984: 6.

Nevada County

Chinatown Street, Nevada County.
Chinatown Street was the location of the first Truckee Chinatown. See Truckee Chinatown,Nevada County. Reference: Meschery 1978: 69-71.

China Close, Nevada County.

China Close is a street less than 500 feet in length off Banner-Quaker Hill Road in a housing development named Cascade Shores near Scotts Flat Reservoir. Reference: Compass Maps 1997.

China Cove, Nevada County.
China Cove is on the southeast side of Donner Lake in Donner Memorial State Park. It was a Chinese settlement during the late 1800's Reference: United States Geological Survey 1983.

China Diggins and Reservoir, Nevada County.

China Diggins and Reservoir is located within Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park, south of Malakoff Diggins across the North Bloomfield Road. It was originally known as Brockmire Diggins. A hydraulic mine, it was purchased by Chinese miners. The mine or excavation is about 4,100 feet long and up to 100 feet wide. The nearby reservoir supplied water for the mining operation. Reference: Felton 1979: 120, 166, 173, Figure 3.
China Ditch, Nevada County.
(1) China Ditch, about 1,200 feet in length, originated at Humbug Creek, flowed through North Bloomfield Chinatown and ended at China Garden. It provided water for the vegetable garden. See China Garden, Nevada County; North Bloomfield Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference:Felton 1979: 50-51.
(2) China Ditch flows in a southwest direction for about eight miles from Lake Wildwood near the town of Rough and Ready. The area has been extensively mined. Reference: Compass Maps 1997.
(3) China Ditch is a canal built by Chinese laborers that takes water from Deer Creek before it joins the Yuba River and transfers it over 12 miles to Smartsville and its surrounding mines. An elevation decrease of 600 feet was accomplished through the construction of seven flumes.Reference: United States Geological Survey 1950; United States Geological Survey 1951 c.
China Flat, Nevada County.
China Flat is an area of low relief with symmetrical peaks surrounding it. China Flat is close to Bear River, recently dammed to form Lake Combie. Long an area of historic mining activity, it is presently a retirement community. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1995.
China Garden, Nevada County.
China Garden was a five-acre vegetable garden operated by Chinese. It supplied fresh produce to the town of North Bloomfield in which it was located. Occasionally, people spoke of it as the second Chinatown of North Bloomfield because of the gardeners who lived near the plot of land. A baseball field covers the area today. See China Ditch, Nevada County; North Bloomfield Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference: Felton 1979: 16,39,157-158, 168, Figure 3.
China Hollow Road, Nevada County.
China Hollow Road is about one mile in length. It is southwest of the Lake of the Pines housing development. Reference: Compass Maps 1997.
China Wall, Nevada County.
A detailed marker placed by the Donner Summit Historical Society. (Marker Number 30.) on Donner Pass Road, Town of Truckee, states, "They were a great army laying siege to Nature in her strongest citadel." -- Beyond the Mississippi, 1869. They worked sunrise to sunset, six days a week, 52 weeks a year. Had it not been for the Chinese workers brought from China, the Central Pacific Railroad would not have been built. More than 8,000 Chinese workers toiled for years to build the railroad from Sacramento to Utah. They endured avalanches, blasting accidents, rock slides, blizzards, icy cold, exhaustion, and prejudice. Ironically, it was first thought Chinese workers would not be acceptable. Leland Stanford supposedly said though, "They built the Great Wall" didn't they? In the American West, they built a great railroad. There were Chinese camps all along the rail route and artifacts can still be found. Of course the railroad is the biggest monument but here, China Wall is a great example of their work. The Sierra are rugged and to lay a rail route with a maximum 3% grade is difficult. Fifteen tunnels had to be blasted through solid granite at inches of progress a day. High spots had to be cut, trestles and bridges to span rivers had to be built, and low spots had to be filled in. China Wall is one such low spot, filled with rubble from the tunnel nearby. Today it would be easy: a few bulldozers could fill it in hours. The Chinese moved the rock and dirt and the filling was done by hand. "I wish to call to your minds that the early completion of this railroad we have built has been in large measure due to that poor, despised class of laborers called the Chinese, to the fidelity and industry they have shown." Judge E.B. Crocker."

China Wall of the Sierra, Nevada County.

A plaque on Donner Pass Road, Truckee, Nevada County, was placed by the Truckee-Donner Historical Society and the Chief Truckee Chapter No. 3691, E. Clampus Vitus. It states, "Charles Crocker, Construction Chief of the Central Pacific Railroad (CPRR), contracted for a workforce of approximately 12,000 Chinese laborers to push the CPRR tracks over its Trans-Sierra Crossing on its race east to a meet with the Union Pacific at Promontory, Utah Territory. A railroad retaining wall and fill, constructed of Sierra granite, stand silently above on the pass as a lasting monument to the Asian “Master Builders” who left an indelible mark on the history of California and the West." 

Chinese Laundry Building, Nevada County.
Chinese Laundry Building was constructed in 1854 at the comer of Flume Street and Highway 49 in the town of North San Juan. However, it was not used by the Chinese until 1890. At that time, a Chinese man known locally as Happy-Go-Lucky by non-Chinese, operated a laundry and store in the structure. The business lasted until 1920. See North San Juan Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979d.
Gin Yet Wah Memorial, Nevada County.
Gin Yet Wah Memorial is on North Bloomfield Road near North Bloomfield Grammar School in Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park. The memorial was the home of Gin Yet Wah. It is a single room structure with a log cabin appearance and an attached shed. Reference: Felton 1979: 109, Figure 3.

Grass Valley Chinatown, Nevada County.
Grass Valley Chinatown in the community of Grass Valley was located between Auburn Street
and Wolf Creek, south of Bank Alley
. Fire consumed Grass Valley Chinatown in the 1870's and
it was not rebuilt. Reference: McGowan 1961: 326
; Sanborn Insurance Map 1891; Wells 1962:
79.

Great Summit Tunnel of the Sierra Nevada, Nevada County.
A plaque references the Chinese workers who helped develop the 1,659 foot long tunnel at the summit (Tunnel 6). It is located along Highway 80 near the community of Norden. See Tunnel 6 Monument, Nevada County. Reference: Hendley 2014.

Nevada City Chinatown, Nevada County.
Nevada City Chinatown in Nevada City was located one block east of Main Street by 1850-1860.
When gold mining in the area ceased
, the Chinese moved on. However, many Chinese artifacts
have been preserved. See Nevada Cit
y Firehouse Museum, Nevada County. Reference: Williams
1971
: 42.

Nevada City Chinese American Cemetery, Nevada County.
Nevada City Chinese American Cemetery was a burial site for Chinese in the 1890's. It still has
burners for paper mone
y, parts of the original fence, a gate and a monument. It is thought that
the cemetery was a permanent burial site unlike others where the deceased was disinterred with
the bones being sent back to China for final interment. Reference: Wey 1988: 147.

Nevada City Firehouse Museum, Nevada County.
The museum has a substantial collection of early Chinese immigrant artifacts and a temple altar.
Reference: Lew 1984: 10
.

North Bloomfield Chinatown, Nevada County.
North Bloomfield Chinatown in Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park was located one block
south of Main Street off Relief Hill Road. It was the home of between 200 and 300 Chinese
laborers and miners. The
y built ditches and accounted for about one-half the miners at the North
Bloomfield Gravel Mining Compan
y. There were stores, residences, a laundry and joss house
within the China
town. See China Garden, Nevada County. Reference: Felton 1979: 16-17,39,
Figure 3.
North Bloomfield Chinese Cemetery, Nevada County.
North Bloomfield Chinese Cemetery, Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park, was next to Haner-
Sherwood Diggins and close to Relief Hill Road. Originally, deceased Chinese were temporarily
buried in the North Bloomfield Cemetery. Eventually, they would be disinterred and the bones
sent to China for reburial. But e
xpansion of the cemetery caused development of another one--for
Chinese only. As of late 1970's
, one Chinese remained buried in the cemetery. Reference: Felton
1979: 162, Figure 3.

North San Juan Chinatown, Nevada County.
Dating to the early 1850's, the community of North San Juan was a thriving gold town. North San
Juan Chinatown persisted until at least 1933, when Sin Get, one of its most respected men, died.
The Chinese of San Juan Chinatown are credited with starting North San Juan's Cherry Festival.
See North San Juan Chinese Cemetery
, Nevada County. Reference: Office of Historic
Preservation 1979d.
North San Juan Chinese Cemetery, Nevada County.
The Chinese of the North San Juan area were interred in North San Juan Chinese Cemetery. A
Chinese man by the name of Sin Get was its custodian. He maintained the cemetery and sent the bones of the deceased to China until 1933 when he died. See North San Juan Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 197ge
Old Chinese Herb Shop, Nevada County.
Old Chinese Herb Shop was built in 1878 at 1 0004 South River Street, City of Truckee. It is the last remnant of the Chinese in Truckee. Early on, Truckee's Chinese population of about 1,000 became the target for anti-Chinese feelings. The prejudice, burning of Chinese dwellings,
shooting and killing of the Chinese resulted in Truckee setting the pace for much of the West's
anti-Chinese movement
. See Chinatown Street, Nevada County; Truckee Chinatown, Nevada
County
; Truckee River Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference: Meschery 1978: 74.
 Shanghai City, Nevada County.      "
Shanghai City was a later name for Shanghai Diggings. See Shanghai Diggings, Nevada County.
Shanghai Diggings, Nevada County.
Shanghai Diggins is on the Middle Fork of the Yuba River at the northwest extremity of Snow
Point above Orleans Flat
. This was an area rich in placer gold deposits that were worked during
the 1870's. Chinese miners were found throughout
. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 315.
Shanghai Hill, Nevada County.
This was another name for Shanghai Diggings. See Shanghai Diggings, Nevada County.
Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975
: 315.
The China Wall, Nevada County.
The China Wall is located on Rough and Ready Highway near the junction of Rough and Ready and Stage Coach Way in the community of Rough and Ready. It is thought to have been built in the 1850's by Chinese workers. The dry stack wall extends for 10 miles. A plaque was placed on the wall by Chapter 10, E. Clampus Vitas. Reference: Whittle 2011.

Truckee Chinatown, Nevada County.
Chinese railroad workers began to settle in the town of Truckee by the early 1870's. They
established Truckee Chinatown between Front Street and High Street on what b
ecame known as Chinatown Street. The residents worked as laundry men, wood hewers and charcoal makers. On May 29, 1875, the flimsy wooden buildings of Truckee Chinatown burned completely. It was soon rebuilt at the same location. However, anti-Chinese sentiment became so strong by November 18, 1878, that a group of about 500 non-Chinese tore down and destroyed all of the structures along Chinatown Street. The Chinese relocated to the south bank of the Truckee River.  See Chinatown Street, Nevada County; Old Chinese Herb Shop, Nevada County; Truckee River Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference: Hagaman and Cottrell 2007: 58; Meschery 1978: 73.
Truckee River Chinatown, Nevada County.
Truckee River Chinatown was built on the south bank of the Truckee River near Bridge Street after the destruction of Truckee Chinatown in 1878. The new community was located beyond Truckee city limits in the hopes that non-Chinese would leave them alone. However, a fire, possibly arson, destroyed about one-half of the settlement in 1880. Continued anti-Chinese sentiment and a 1885-1886 boycott of people who hired Chinese brought an end to the Chinese community. See Chinatown Street, Nevada County; Truckee Chinatown, Nevada County. Reference: Hagaman and Cottrell 2007: 58; Meschery 1978: 73.

Tunnel 6 Monument, Nevada County.
Tunnel 6 Monument is on Sugar Bowl Road, community of Norden. The monument details Chinese drilling through granite for the construction of the railroad over the Sierra Nevada Mountains. See Great Summit Tunnel of the Sierra Nevada, Nevada County. Reference: Swackhamer 2015. 

Washington Plaque, Nevada County.
Washington Plaque is at the intersection of Washington Road and Alpha Toll Road in the community of Washington. It addresses the discovery of gold in the south Yuba River and the Chinese who mined there. Reference: Swackhamer 2010.


Placer County
Adobe Store Building, Placer County.
Adobe Store Building is on Stockton Road, community of Dutch Flat, Placer County. The Placer County Historical Society plaque indicates that the structure was built by the Chinese in 1870, using a solid wall construction (rammed earth). Reference: Swackhamer 2010. 

Auburn Chinatown, Placer County.
Located around Sacramento Street in Auburn, Auburn Chinatown was another early Chinatown in the Mother Lode Country. It had a joss house and several stores that were operated by the Chinese. The stores are still evident on the south side of Sacramento Street. See Auburn Chinatown Joss House, Placer County; Auburn Steam Laundry Building, Placer County; Quam Hi Store Building, Placer County; Shanghai Restaurant Building, Placer County. ReferenceNadeau 1992: 66; Williams 1971: 43.
Auburn Chinatown Joss House, Placer County.
Auburn Chinatown Joss House at 200 Sacramento Street, City of Auburn, dates to about 1860. It replaced an earlier joss house that was destroyed by fire in 1855. See Auburn Chinatown, Placer County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1986a.
,
Auburn Steam Laundry Building, Placer County.
Auburn Steam Laundry building was built about 1875 at 157 Sacramento Street, City of Auburn. It was operated by Chinese. See Auburn Chinatown, Placer County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1986b.
Bloomers Cut, Placer County.
Bloomers Cut is located at the intersection of Herdal Drive and Quinn Way in the community of Auburn, Placer County. A plaque details the effort of the Chinese in creating a cut through solid rock for the Central Pacific Railroad in 1864. The plaque was placed there by the Native Sons of the Golden West. Reference: Gerchle. 

Cape Horn Passage, Placer County.
Cape Horn is a protrusion or knob of granite in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. It is about one mile northeast of the town of Colfax on Highway 80. Railroad construction had reached Cape Horn by 1865. In order to construct the rail bed, Chinese laborers hung in baskets down the face of Cape Horn with a tributary of the American River about 1,400 feet below them. Thus suspended, they then drilled into the rock and placed dynamite charges. The fuse would be lit and the basket quickly hauled upward before the detonation. In 1999, a plaque was placed near the site by the Colfax Historical Society commemorating the role of the Chinese in the construction of the Cape Horn Passage. Reference: Chinn 1969: 45.

China Bar, Placer County.
China Bar was the scene of considerable hydraulic gold mining. It is two and one-half miles from the junction of the Middle Fork of the American River and Duncan Canyon River. Reference:United States Geological Survey 1961.
China Garden Road, Placer County.
China Garden Road parallels Highway 80 on its east side in the City of Rocklin. Reference:Compass Maps 1998.
China Mine Road, Placer County.
China Mine Road is southeast of Highway 80 near Choctaw Trace and Rock Springs Road between the towns of Loomis and Newcastle. The area has experienced considerable gold mining. Reference: Compass Maps 1998.

China RanchPlacer County.
Located about two miles west of Blue Canyon, China Ranch was not a livestock ranch. It was
actual
ly a vegetable garden owned and operated by a Chinese farmer. It was noted as an
important place in an
1878 travel guide. Reference: Towle 1994: 363.
China Town, Placer County.
China Town, spelled as two words, was a Chinese community just below Dotans Bar on the
North Fork of the
American River. It appeared on a map dated 1887. Reference: Gudde and
Gudde
1975: 71.
China Wall Iowa Hill Ditch, Placer County.
China Wall Iowa Hill Ditch is about 14 miles in length and runs parallel to the North Fork of the
American River on its south side. It moves water from east to west and ends at Forks House
some 11 m
iles from Forest Hill, north of Forest Hill Divide Road. The water was important to
the
various mines in the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1979c.
China Well Road, Placer County.
China Well Road has an overall north-south orientation and extends to Baxter Grade Road.
China Well Road is about four miles northwest of the City of Auburn in a gold mining area.
Reference: Compass Maps 1998.
Chinese Houses, Placer County.
Chinese Houses were along Sacramento Street, community of Auburn, Placer County. A plaque at the site indicates that a fire in 1855 burned 80 buildings, including the Chinese houses. Reference: Swackhamer 2016. 

Chinese Railroad Workers Monument. Placer County.
Chinese Railroad Workers Monument is at the Gold Run Safety Rest Area, Interstate 80, near the community of Gold Run. The monument is dedicated to the thousands of Chinese who worked on the construction of the transcontinental railroad in 1865. Reference: Whittle 2009.

Chinese Store, Placer County.
A Chinese general merchandise store operated out of an adobe warehouse in Dutch Flat. The
s
tructure was built in the 1870's. See Dutch Flat Chinatown, Placer County.
Colfax Chinese Business Area, Placer County.
The Chinese business area in the town of Colfax was west of the railroad tracks on the west side of Main Street near School Road. There were two laundries. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1887.
Donner Summit Railroad Tunnel, Placer County.
Chinese workers began work on the Donner Summit Railroad Tunnel near Donner Lake in the
winter of 1866. The snow was so deep that the worker camps were buried. To move from one
camp
to another, passage ways were dug beneath the snow. Snow slides were frequent, carrying away entire camps and killing many of the Chinese. The railroad tunnel was completed in mid- 1868. Reference: Chinn 1969: 45.
Dutch Flat Chinatown, Placer County.
By 1860, Dutch Flat Chinatown was located next to the railroad tracks one mile above Dutch
F
lat itself. Fire destroyed 40 to 50 of its buildings in 1873. It was quickly rebuilt, having 56
d
wellings and about 150 Chinese residents in 1880. However, it suffered another fire in 1881
with a loss of almost all of its buildings. See Dutch Flat Chinese, Placer County. Reference:
Hoover 1990; Office of Historic Preservation 1979f.
Dutch Flat Chinese, Placer County.
The Chinese of Dutch Flat were identified by a plaque stating, "Founded in the Spring of 1851
by Joseph and Charles Dornbach. From 1854 to 1882 it was noted for its rich hydraulic mines
.
In 1860 had the largest voting population in Placer County. Chinese inhabitants numbered about
2,000. Here Theodore Judah and Dr. D. W. Strong made the original subscription to build the
first transcontinental railroad
." The plaque was placed by the California Centennial Commission
and Placer Count
y Historical Society in 1950. The site is California Historical Landmark No.
397. See Dutch Flat China
town, Placer County.
Dutch Flat Chinese Cemetery, Placer County.
Dutch Flat Chinese Cemetery was part of the Euro American cemetery of Dutch Flat. See Dutch
Flat Chinatown, Placer County.
First Transcontinental Railroad-Auburn, Placer County.
Auburn is the location of a plaque that recognizes the first Chinese railroad workers. It reads,
"
After an l l-month delay due to political opposition and lack of money, Central Pacific tracks
reached Auburn Ma
y 13, 1865, and regular service began. Government loans became available
when the railroad completed its first 40 miles
, four miles east of here. With the new funds,
Central Pacific augmented its force with the first Chinese laborers, and work began again in
earnest.
" The plaque was placed in cooperation with the Conference of California Historical
Societies and Placer County Historical Society in 1969. The location is also California Historical
Landmark No. 780
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1990: 149.
Lincoln Chinese Business Area, Placer County.
The Chinese business area of the town of Lincoln was between F Street and G Street on Sixth
Street. It consisted of three laundries in 1893. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1893.
Mandarin Hill Lane, Placer County.
Mandarin Hill Lane is southwest of the town of Penryn off Rippey Road. It is in an area that has
experienced extens
ive gold mining. Reference: Compass Maps 1998.
Mongolian Flat, Placer County,
Mongolian Flat was a place along the American River that was worked by Chinese miners
according to photographs held b
y the California Historical Society. Reference: Chan
1986: 53
, 57.
Newcastle China Town, Placer County.
Newcastle China Town (two words) was located in a ravine just north of the town of Newcastle.
Along with residences and businesses, there was a temple and Chinese school. Construction of
Highwa
y 40 through the area resulted in Newcastle China Town being torn down. Reference:
Gudde and Gudde 1975: 71; Wells 1962: 79.
Placerville Chinatown, Placer County.
Located south of Main Street in the community of PlacervillePlacerville Chinatown was a
thriving place by 1850-1860. The last remaining building is known as Stone House. See Stone
House, Placer County
. Reference: Lew 1977: 11; Williams 1971: 44.
Quam Hi Store Building, Placer County.
Quam Hi Store building is at 150 Sacramento Street, City of Auburn. It was the location of a
grocery store operated by a Chinese man in about 1870. See Auburn Chinatown, Placer County
.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1986c.
Rocklin-Roseville Chinatown, Placer County.
This Chinatown was situated between the communities of Rocklin and Roseville. On September
16, 1877, all the Chinese living in there were driven out and its 25 buildings burned to the
ground
. The action stemmed from an incident when a Chinese killed three non-Chinese.
Reference: McGowan 1961: 326.    

Shanghai Restaurant Building, Placer County.
Shanghai Restaurant building at 289 Washington Street, City of Auburn, has been the location
of the Shanghai Restaurant since it began in 1908. See Auburn Chinatown
, Placer County.
Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1986d
.
Stone House, Placer County.
Stone House is the last building of Placerville Chinatown in the community of Placerville. It was
built by Chinese around 1865 and used as an herb store
. Through the years, it was also reputed
to have been an opium den, gambling house and brothel (upstairs)
. The structure has been
restored and is presently an office building. See Placerville Chinatown
, Placer County.
Reference: Lew 1977: 11; Williams 1971: 44
.
The Chinese Coolie Statue. Placer County.
The Chinese Coolie Statue is at 601 Lincoln Way, City of Auburn. The steel and cement public art is 22 feet tall, 33 feet long and depicts a Chinese laborer with a conical hat pushing a wheel barrow. It is a tribute to the Chinese laborers who helped build the trans-continental railroad. Reference: "The Coolie-Ken Fox Statue." Photo.

Virginiatown Chinatown, Placer County.
Virginiatown Chinatown is immediately west of the community of Virginia town. The Chinatown
resulted from the Chinese being banned from living in Virginiato
wn itself in 1860. There were
at least 12 buildings in Virginiatown Chinatown b
y 1861, most of which were on the north and
south side of Main Street
. The number increased to 27 by 1862 and included general stores,
restaurants, butcher shops, blacksmith shop and joss house. The last of the Chinese were forced
to leave in 1906 when the Euro American lando
wner evicted them. See Virginiatown Engellenner
Chinese Cemetery
, Placer County. Reference: Farncomb 1994: 49-66.
Virginiatown Engellenner Chinese Cemetery, Placer County.
Virginiatown Engellenner Chinese Cemetery is located on the edge of the Euro American section
of Virginiatown behind the Engellenner house
. Thirty-three grave depressions are still apparent.
See Virginiatown Chinese Cemetery No. 3, Placer County. Reference: Farncomb 1994: 63.
Virginiatown Chinese Cemetery No.3, Placer County.
The third Chinese cemetery of Virginia town is on a hill south of Virginia town Chinese Women's
Cemetery
. Virginiatown Chinese Cemetery No.3 is the same size as Virginiatown Engellenner Chinese Cemetery. Some of the grave depressions are still apparent. See Virginiatown Chinese Women's Cemetery, Placer County. Reference: Famcomb 1994: 64.

Virginiatown Chinese Women's Cemetery, Placer County.
Virginiatown Chinese Women's Cemetery is located near Virginiatown just south of what is presently known as the Virginiatown Adobe (K. Takamoto House). At least a dozen grave depressions were filled in as part of a construction project. See Virginiatown Chinatown, Placer County. Reference: Farncomb 1994: 64,66.


 Plumas County
Belden Chinatown, Plumas County.
Belden Chinatown was located on the old county road in the community of Belden on the North
Fork of the Feather River. The Chinatown was surrounded by a high wooden fence with a single
gate into the area
. By the 1890's, there were still about 200 Chinese gold miners working the area
around Belden. Reference: Pricer 1996: 60.
China Bar, Plumas County.
(1) China Bar is along the North Fork of the Feather River about six miles northwest of the
community of Twain. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1980d.
(2) China Bar is on the east branch of North Fork of the Feather River. It is approximately one
mile east of the community of Twain. Reference
: United States Geological Survey 1980e.
China Camp, Plumas County.
China Camp was situated between Willow Bar and Junction Bar on the North Fork of the Feather
River. China Camp residents were laborers and cooks for the hydraulic mining operation that
worked Willow Bar
. Reference: Pricer 1996: 60.
China Creek, Plumas County.
China Creek, in Lassen National Forest, is an intermittent stream. When it contains water, it
flows northeast - to-southwest for one and one-third miles, where it joins Rock Creek
. Rock Creek
merges with the North Fork of the Feather River. Reference
: United States Geological Survey
1980d.
China Grade Road, Plumas County.
China Grade Road is a north-south oriented improved road that joins County Route A22 about
one and one-half miles west of Taylorville. Extending over a ridge, it was constructed by Chinese
labor. Reference: Compass Maps 1996; Pricer 1996: 58
.
China Gulch, Plumas County.
(1) China Gulch in the Plumas National Forest has a perennial stream two miles in length that flows
east to west where it joins Lights Creek
. The area has experienced tunnel and shaft mining.
(2) China Gulch has a north-to-south flowing stream that feeds into Middle Fork of the Feather
River within Plumas National Forest. There has been gold mining in the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1980a.

China Ravine, Plumas County.
China Ravine, Lassen National Forest, has an intermittent stream flowing for about three-
quarters of a mile, traveling in a west-to-east direction. The area is the site of both placer and
t
unnel and shaft mining. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1979a.

China Rock, Plumas County.
China Rock is located on the grounds of the present-day Quincy High School in the community of Quincy. The stone commemorates Quincy Chinatown. See Quincy Chinatown, Plumas County. Reference: Pricer 1996: 66.
 Claireville Chinatown, Plumas County
Claireville Chinatown was in the community of Claireville. Claireville itself was originally
railroad construction town. Accordingly, most of the Chinese of Claireville Chinatown were
emplo
yed building the Sierra Valley and Mohawk Railroad bed in the 1880's. A fire in 1903
comp
letely destroyed Claireville Chinatown. Reference: Pricer 1996: 62.

Crescent Mills Chinatown, Plumas County.
Crescent Mills Chinatown in the community of Crescent Mills was a thriving place at the peak
of gold
mining in northern Plumas County. A reunion of Chinese miners who had worked at the Green Mountain/Crescent Mine drew 250 participants in 1890. Reference: Pricer 1996: 58.

Greenville Chinatown, Plumas County.
Greenville Chinatown was located on the west side of Wolf Creek bridge in the community of
Green
ville. Greenville Chinatown had a saloon, store and public bath. The Chinese who lived
there
worked as miners and laborers. Reference: Pricer 1996: 58-59.

Indian Valley Chinese Cemetery, Plumas County.
Indian Valley Chinese Cemetery is on the south slope on the left side of Round Valley Dam at
Round Valley Lake
. It was the only Chinese cemetery in Indian Valley and was primarily a place of temporary interment. Today, two graves remain--those of a husband and wife. The site is surrounded by a picket fence. Reference: Pricer 1996: 59.

Jamison City Chinatown, Plumas County.
Jamison City Chinatown was in the small community of Jamison City. Both were built on a
narrow river terrace next to Jamison Creek. Jamison City Chinatown was completely destroyed
b
y fire in 1871. Reference: Pricer 1996: 63.

La Porte Chinatown, Plumas County.
La Porte Chinatown was established in 1858 along Rabbit Creek in the community of La Porte, Butte County. Soon thereafter, Plumas County was created out of Butte County. As a result, La Porte Chinatown became part of Plumas County. By the 1860 census countthere were 136 Chinese living and working there as laborers, minersmerchants, cooks, and gardeners. The population increased to 248 in 1870 but by 1880, the number had decreased to 50 as the mining opportunities diminishedThrough the years, fires within La Porte Chinatown resulted in a reduction of its physical size. The blaze of 1905 destroyed most of itReference: Pricer 1996: 55, 57.

Plumas County Museum, Plumas County.
Plumas County Museum at 500 Jackson Street in the town of Quincy has a permanent exhibit
about the Chinese in Plumas County.Reference: United States Geological Survey 1980b. 
Sierra County
China Bar, Sierra County.
China Bar is about two and one-quarter miles due south of La Porte near Slate Creek on the
border of Sierra and Plumas County
. The area is dominated by .evidence of extensive placer and
tunnel and shaft gold mining. Reference: United States Geological Surve
y 1951 a.

China Flat, Sierra County.
China Flat is on the south side of North Yuba River and Highway 49 approximately seven miles
west of Sierra Cit
y. It is a broad flat area about one-third of a mile in length within Tahoe
National Forest
. Although the name of the place has changed through the years, a recent
topographic map uses the name China Flat
. Placer mining started in the area during the 1850s.
See Chinese Flat, Sierra County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1981.
China Ravine, Sierra County.
China Ravine, Plumas National Forest, has a seasonal stream that flows into Big Grizzly Creek.
It is one-quarter mile southeast of Poker Flat. The area has many mines. Reference: United States
Geological Survey 1951b
.
Chinese Bar, Sierra County.
Located on the Yuba River in Tahoe National Forest, Chinese Bar is on the inside of a stream
meander, an ideal place for placer gold mining. In fact, there is extensive evidence of placer and
tunnel and shaft mining throughout the area. Reference
: United States Geological Survey 1949a.
Chinese Camp, Sierra County.
Chinese Camp is in the Slate Creek Basin on the road from La Porte to Portmine. The place name
appears in a report about mines and mining dated 1872
. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 71.
Chinese Flat, Sierra County.
Chinese Flat is on the North Fork of the Yuba River about three miles east of Downieville. A
map of the area dated 1868 shows the placename of China Flat
. However, a map dated 1874
shows the name Chinese Flat
. This latter name was officially recognized by the California State
Bureau of Mines and Geology
. Chinese Flat became one of the first automobile camp grounds
in the area. Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975
: 71

Downieville Chinatown, Sierra County.
Downieville Chinatown was located on Main Street in the community of Downieville in 1852.By 1902, there was still a joss house and four dwellings. See Downieville Chinese Building, Sierra County. Reference: Nadeau 1992: 161; Sanborn Insurance Map 1902a.

Downieville Museum, Sierra County.
Downieville Museum on Main Street in the town of Downieville maintains displays of Chinese artifacts. See Downieville Chinese Building, Sierra County.

Downieville Chinese Building, Sierra County.
Located on the south side of Main Street in Downieville, the Downieville Chinese building was once a store and gambling house. It was built in 1852 and features mortarless schist rock, iron doors and shutters typical of the era. It is now the home of the Downieville Museum. See Downieville Chinatown, Sierra County. Reference: Nadeau 1992: 161.
r

Sierra County Historical Park and Museum, Sierra County.
The museum, located in Sierra City, contains displays of early Chinese immigrant artifacts.

Tuolumne County

Big Gap Flume, Tuolumne County.
Big Gap Flume was constructed by Chinese workers of the Golden Rock Water Company. It carried water to the gold mining areas as part of a 36-mile long water supply system for miners in Big Oak Flat, Garrotte, Moccasin Creek and other nearby areas. Reference: Otheta 1948: 28.

Big Oak Flat Chinatown, Tuolumne County.
Big Oak Flat Chinatown in the community of Big Oak Flat was an important center for the Chinese during the early days of placer mining in the area. Like other Chinatowns, it provided merchandise, news of home and companionship. Reference: Otheta 1948: 31.

Big Oak Flat Chinese Cemetery, Tuolumne County.
Big Oak Flat Chinese Cemetery in the community of Big Oak Flat was used for temporary interment of the Chinese. After a few years the bones were disinterred and sent to China for final burial. Reference: Barron 1974: 459.

Chinaman Creek, Tuolumne County.
Chinaman Creek flows for three and one-half miles before joining Middle Fork of the Stanislaus River. It is about eight miles from the community of Long Barn. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1956.

Chinee, Tuolumne County.

Chinee was a name that appeared on maps during the early period of what is now called Chinese Camp. See Chinese Camp, Tuolumne County
Chinee Camp, Tuolumne County.
ChineeCamp was an early name for Chinese Camp. See Chinese Camp, Tuolumne County.
Chinese Alley, Tuolumne County.
According to a map dated 1872, Chinese Alley was a street in Chinese Camp Chinatown. See
Chinese Camp Chinatown, Tuolumne County. Reference
: Bloomfield 1994: 45, 57, end piece
map.
Chinese Camp, Tuolumne County.
By 1849, a group of Englishmen intent on gold mining had organized a company, bought a ship,
contracted with Chinese laborers and arrived in Stockton. The laborers walked to the mining area
and established a claim near Campo Salvador. Once gold was found
, other miners drove off the
Chinese. They relocated over the nearest hill in an unclaimed area--the northwest com
er of
present-day Chinese Camp
. That place has been identified as Chinese Diggings, Chinee, Chinee
Camp and Chinese Camp. The latter name was commonl
y used by 1850 and it became official
when a post office
, opening in 1854, used the name. Placer mining continued in the area until
1870. The first tong war in the state was fought nearby
. A plaque commemorating Chinese Camp
was erected b
y the California Centennial Commission and the Tuolumne County Council No.
2165 of the Knights of Columbus in 1949. Chinese Camp is California Historical Landmark No.
423. See Chinese Alley, Tuolumne County; Kentucky Ranch, Tuolumne County. Reference:
Bloomfield 1994: 20-27; Towle 1994: 176.
Chinese Camp Chinatown, Tuolumne County.
By 1860, the United States Census indicated a Chinatown within the town of Chinese Camp. It
was located north of Main Street and west of present-day Red Hills Road
. It was home for about
. 25 percent of the town's Chinese population. See Chinese Alley, Tuolumne County; Chinese
Camp, Tuolumne County
. Reference: Bloomfield 1994: 45, 57.
Chinese Camp Road, Tuolumne County.
Chinese Camp Road was the primary access to the town of Chinese Camp. See Chinese Camp,
Tuolumne County.
Chinese Camp School, Tuolumne County.
Chinese Camp School, a public school, was named after the town in which it was located. See
Chinese Camp, Tuolumne Count
y.
Chinese Diggings, Tuolumne County.
This was an earlier name for Chinese Camp. See Chinese Camp, Tuolumne County.
Chinese Station, Tuolumne County.
Chinese Station was the first railroad station in the Mother Lode. It was located at Milepost 35
of the Sierra Railroad and was two miles northeast of Chinese Camp from where it took its name.
Constructed on a placer-graveled flat in 1897, Chinese Station became an important freight and
passenger terminal for the mines and Yosemite Valley. Reference: Deane 1960: 23. 
Dragon Gulch Flat, Tuolumne County.
Some might think this is a Chinese place name because of the association of the dragon with
Chinese culture
. But, the name was actually given to the spot because of a group of
Euro American deserters from the United States Army Dragoons who settled in the area.
Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975: 100-101.
Jamestown Chinese Business Area, Tuolumne County.
The Chinese business area of the community of Jamestown was on the east side of Main Street
between Willow Street and Seco Street
. In 1898, there were two laundries and a large vegetable garden. Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1898b.
Kentucky Ranch, Tuolumne County.
Kentucky Ranch is at the junction of La Grange and Chinese Camp Road. The ranch land was
the site of the first tong war in California
. It arose because one group of Chinese miners refused to remove a boulder that had rolled onto' the claim of another group of Chinese miners. Ultimately, it was decided that the dispute would be settled with a battle. One side, the Yang Woo (Yeong Wo), called Hong Kongs, fielded about 900 men. The other side, the Sam Yup or Cantons, had some 1,200 men. Approximately 5,000 observers watched the melee fought on October 24, 1856. At the conclusion, four Chinese were killed with four wounded. About 250 were arrested but no charges were brought. Reference: Barron 1974: 453-458.
Montezuma Chinatown, Tuolumne County.
Not far from Chinese Camp, Montezuma Chinatown in the community of Montezuma, often
rivaled Chinese Camp in terms of population and economic activity. Montezuma Chinatown boasted an all-Chinese hotel and it was said that the Chinese kept many non-Chinese Montezuma merchants in business. Reference: Williams 1971: 46.
Museum of Chinese Artifacts, Tuolumne County.
Located within the Columbia State Historic Park, the museum contains exhibits and displays of Chinese artifacts dating from the 1850's to the 1900's. The park is also an excellent place to see the Tree of Heaven. Editors of Olympus Press 1988: 178.
Sonora Chinatown, Tuolumne County.
The last remaining structure of the Sonora Chinatown in Sonora is a brick portal. A plaque
affixed to the portal reads, "To the memory of the Chinese pioneers who for years made this
section their home." Reference: Lew 1984
: 7.

Yuba County
Bok Kai Chinese Wall Memorial, Yuba County.

Bok Kai Chinese Wall Memorial is a three-foot high wall constructed of stacked, un-mortared
rocks. It is next to the path leading to the Bok Kai Temple in Marysville. A plaque on the wall
states, "The close proximity of the gold mines and the railroad construction contributed to 
Marysville large Chinese population in the mid to late 1800's. When those activities diminishedthe Chinese worked in various occupations, with many as laborers building rock walls throughout northern counties. This section of rock wall was relocated from the Sutter Buttes in a tribute to the Chinese that settled in Marysville's historic Chinatown. Marysville Lions Club1992." See Great Wall of China, Butte County; Butte County Rock Walls, Butte County.
Bok Kai Street, Yuba County.
Bok Kai Street is a north-south street extending from First Street to Fifth Street near the original
Bok Kai Temple. See Bok Kai Mui, Yuba County. Reference: Compass Maps 1997.
Bok Kai Mui, Yuba County.
Bok Kai Mui was the original Bok Kai Temple of Marysville Chinatown, City of Marysville. It
was located near the comer of First Street and B Street on what became known as Bok Kai
Street
. It was dedicated in 1854, five years after the Chinese first appeared in the city. The name
refers to the temple's main deity who is said to control water, an imp~ant consideration for
Marysville, being at the confluence of the Yuba and Feather River, both of which frequently
flood. Damage to the temple caused a new one to be built at the base of D Street
. See Bok Kai
Street
, Yuba County. Reference: Buschman 1963; Ibanez 1967: 2,6.
Bok Kai Temple, Yuba County.
After Bok Kai Mui, City of Marysville, was severely damaged by flood waters, a new temple was
constructed on D Street
. Its principle deity is Bok Kai who controls water. Related is the holiday
of Yee Yent Yee (Bomb Day) or the Bok Kai Festival, as it is usually known., It is a celebration
that dates to 1872, making it one of the oldest celebrations in the state. It is held in February. The
temple is California Historical Landmark No. 889. See Bok Kai Chinese Memorial Wall, Yuba
County; Marysville Chinatown, Yuba Count
y. Reference: Chace 1994. Photo.
Celestial Valley, Yuba County.
Celestial Valley, possibly associated with Chinese miners, is three miles south of Comptonville
on Oregon Creek
. It was an area of placer mining until 1877 . Reference: Gudde and Gudde 1975:
65
Chinese School Building, Yuba County.
Chinese School building, located at 226 First Street, City of Marysville, was built in 1912. It is within historic Marysville Chinatown. See Marysville Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1977 a.
Hop Sing Society Building, Yuba County.
Hop Sing Society building at 109 C Street, City of Marysville, was built in 1918. It displays a
Chinese architectural style similar to association buildings in San Francisco Chinatown. See
Marysville Chinatown, Yuba County
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1977b.
Kim Wing Building, Yuba County.
Built in 1913, Kim Wing building is located at 228 First Street, City of Marysville. It is part of
Marysville Chinatown. See Marysville Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1977c.
Marysville Chinatown, Yuba County.
Marysville Chinatown, City of Marysville, was in the area of Elm Street and First Street and C Street and Front Street. Its Chinese population was between 1850 and 1900, sometimes being second in size only to San Francisco Chinatown. Some 2,000 laborers and miners would converge on Marysville Chinatown during holidays where they found entertainment, shopping and a temple. It was the location of the headquarters for various social organizations, a Chinese school and two opera houses. See Bok Kai Temple, Yuba County; Chinese School Building, Yuba County; Hop Sing Society Building, Yuba County; Kim Wing Building, Yuba County; Yee Fow, Yuba County. Reference: Ibanez 1967: 5.
Marysville Chinese Pavilion, Yuba County.
Marysville Chinese Pavilion in the City of Marysville is adjacent to Bok Kai Temple.
Celebrating the Chinese of Marysville, it was built in 1979 with construction material and
workers provided by the Republic of China. The pavilion is on the site of the Lotus Inn, a
restaurant of MJ
ysville Chinatown that was torn down as part of an urban renewal project.
Listed on a nearby plaque are a great many individuals and organizations that aided in the
establishment of Marysville Chinese Pavilion. See Bok Kai Mui, Yuba County; Bok Kai Temple, Yuba County; Marysville Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference: Redman 1995.
Marysville City Cemetery, Yuba County.
By 1862, the Chinese had exclusive use of the northern side of Marysville City Cemetery. There was a shrine, dedicated to "Good Chinese Friends," a platform and brick burner for offerings. Ch'ing Ming was celebrated from its beginning. By the turn of the century, it was no longer in use. Reference: Chace 1992: 70, 93.
Suey Sing Store Building, Yuba County.
Suey Sing Store building was built in the 1850s in the town of Timbuctoo near Smartsville on Highway 20. It was originally a Wells Fargo office. Suey Ah You and his wife operated a store out of the building. It is also the place where the Suey Sing Tong was formed. The building is California Historic Landmark No. 320. See Timbuctoo Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference:Office of Historic Preservation 1979f.
Timbuctoo Chinatown, Yuba County.
Timbuctoo Chinatown in the town of Timbuctoo began as a result of gold mining in the area of
Timbuctoo and Smartsville in 1854
. Its residents worked as laborers and then miners. By 1879, Timbuctoo Chinatown had four Chinese-operated stores and a laundry. See Suey Sing Store Building, Yuba County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979g.

Wheatland Chinatown, Yuba County.
Wheatland Chinatown was located between Railroad Avenue and D Street and from Third Street to Second Street in the town of Wheatland. It contained commercial businesses, a gambling house, laundry and residential structures. By 1874, the Chinese accounted for about one-third of the entire population. In 1884, there was one laundry and 10 dwellings. On February 25, 1886, anti-Chinese violence in the guise of 30 masked men raided a local farm, be~ eleven Chinese farm workers and destroyed their bunk house. Soon thereafter, the Chinese left the area, including Wheatland Chinatown. See Wheatland Chinese Cemetery, Yuba County; Wheatland Chinese Gardens, Yuba County. Reference: Ibanez 1967: 16; Office of Historic Preservation 1979g; Sanborn Insurance Map 1884c, 1899.
Wheatland Chinese Cemetery, Yuba County.
All that remains of Wheatland Chinese Cemetery in the town of Wheatland is a ceremonial
burner
. Although its reconstruction may differ from the original, it is considered to be a
monument to the early Chinese pioneers
. See Wheatland Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference:
Office of Historic Preservation 1979g.
Wheatland Chinese Gardens, Yuba County.
Wheatland Chinese Gardens was located just south of the town of Wheatland. Chinese vegetable growers provided fresh produce to the town and surrounding area. See Wheatland Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1979h.
Yee Fow, Yuba County.
Yee Fow, meaning Second City, is the Chinese term for Marysville Chinatown. It indicates that
Marysville Chinatown was often considered to have had the second largest Chinese population
in the state. See Marysville Chinatown, Yuba County. Reference: Wong 1987
: 308. 


References
Barron, Beverly. 1974. "The Celestial Empire." CHISPA: The Quarterly of the Tuolumne
            Count
y Historical Society. April-June: 453-459.

Bloomfield, Anne with Benjamin F. H. Ananian, and Philip Choy. 1994. History of Chinese
            Camp: Cultural Resources Inventory.
Tuolumne County Historic Preservation Review
            Commission.
Book, Susan W. 1976. The Chinese in Butte County, California: 1860-1920. San Francisco: R
            and E Research Associates.
Born, Barbara. 1995. April 15. Docent, Pioneer History Center. Interview.
Browning, Peter. 1986. Place Names of the Sierra Nevada. Berkeley: Wilderness Press.
Buchanan
, Carrie. 1963. "Chinese at Rail Road Flat." Las Calaveras: Quarterly Bulletin of the
            Calaveras Historical Society, July: 3.
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