Northern California

Chinese Del Norte, Siskiyou, Modoc, Humboldt, Trinity, Shasta, Mendocino,


Del Norte County
China Mine, Del Norte County.
Thought to have been worked by the Chinese, China Mine is one of many mines in Six Rivers
National Forest
. It is on the east side of Big Flat Road about two miles north of Big Flat Forest
Service Station where Hurdygurdy Creek enters South Fork of the Smith River
. Reference:
United States Geological Survey 1982b.
Gasquet Toll Road, Del Norte County.
Chinese workers built the Gasquet toll road between 1881 and 1886. It was one of the first roads
to connect Del Norte County and Six Rivers National Forest with southern Oregon. Known as
a corduroy road because its surface was made of logs, it is still usable today. Reference: Wey
1988: 134-135.

Humboldt County
China Camp, Humboldt County.
China Camp was a Chinese settlement located between Grizzly Creek and Bridgeville.
Reference: Turner 1993: 49.
China Creek, Humboldt County.
(1) China Creek flows into Camp Creek about six miles northwest of the town of Orleans. There
was extensive dredging throughout the area and in the nearby Klamath River
. Reference: United
States Geological Survey 1978c

(2) China Creek is a year-round creek that flows about three miles. It joins Redwood Creek onequarter mile south of the community of Brice land. Reference: Turner 1993: 49; United States Geological Survey 1969.
(3) China Creek flows one and three quarters of a mile in a west to east direction all year. It 
passes beneath Highway 299. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1979f.
(4) China Creek moves in a southwest to northeast direction for three quarters of a mile through
Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation
. It eventually joins the Klamath River. Reference: United States
Geological Survey 1982g
.
(5) China Creek is an east flowing stream of about two and one half miles in length. It moves
through a part of the community of Willow Springs and crosses Highway 299 before joining the
Trinity River
. Reference: DeLorme 1988: 43; United States Geological Survey 1979b.
China Flat, Humboldt County.
China Flat was the settlement of Chinese laborers who worked in local mines and lumber camps
within Six Rivers National Forest
. A post office was established there in 1878 with the name
China Flat
. The name of the post office was changed to Willow Creek in 1915. Reference: Turner
1993: 49, 235; United States Geological Survey 1979b.
China Gulch, Humboldt County.
China Gulch has a perennial stream that flows for six tenths of a mile in an east-to-west manner.
It joins Brown Creek within Six Rivers National Forest. There is evidence of mining and dredging
in the area
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1978c. 
Eureka China Town, Humboldt County.
The Chinese community known as Eureka China Town (spelled as two words) was located in
Eureka between 3rd Street and 4th St
reet and E Street and F Street. Well established by the early
1880's, the bui
ldings displayed a Chinese architectural appearance. A shooting incident involving
two tongs accidentally killed one non-Chinese and wounded another on February 6, 1885. A town
meeting was immediately called where the decisio
n was made to evict all Chinese within 24 hours.
The Chinese departed the next day on two steamers. The only Chinese to remain was Charlie
Moon, who had married a Native American woma
n. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation
1976: 2
06; Turner 1993: 49.
Willow Springs-China Flat Museum, Humboldt County.
This is a small museum in the community of Willow Springs. Its collection focuses on local
h
istory with little mention of the Chinese. See China Flat, Humboldt County.

Lassen County

 China Creek, Lassen County.
China Creek is an intermittent stream that flows south-to-north. It continues for about six miles
where it enters
Willard Creek near the junction of Highway 36 and Highway 44 five miles west
of Susanville. The area has been extensively mined. Reference: Compass Maps 1996.

Mendocino County
China Gate, Mendocino County.
China Gate is a gap or pass through Goat Ridge and South Ridge at about 2,600 feet above sea
level
. It provides somewhat easy passage through a region characterized by steep mountains and
is six and one half
miles northeast of the town of Booneville. Reference: United States Geological
Survey I
~991.

China Gulch, Mendocino County.
(1) China Gulch is a one and one-half mile long stream flowing through China Gulch flows that passes near the coastal community of Gualala on Highway One near the Mendocino-Sonoma County border. Reference:
United States Geological Survey 1960.
(2) China Gulch is a two-mile-long perennial stream that flows southeast to northwest. It is about
eight
miles northwest of the town of Gualala. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1960.
Fort Bragg Chinatown, Mendocino County.
Fort Bragg Chinatown served the needs of the Chinese who worked at local lumber camps and
ranches
. Located in the community of Fort Bragg between MacPherson Street and Harrison
Street and Red
wood Avenue and Laurel Avenue, it provided supplies and cultural continuity with
China. There w
ere few stores left in Fort Bragg Chinatown by 1926. Reference: Sanborn
Insurance Map, 1893; Wong 1987: 113.
Mo Dai Miu, Mendocino County.
Mo Dai Miu is an alternate spelling for Wu Ti Miao. See Wu Ti Miao, Mendocino County.
Temple of Kuan Ti, Mendocino County.
This is another name for Wu Ti Miao. Kuan Ti (Kwan Kung) was the principal deity of the
temple. See Wu Ti
Miao, Mendocino County.
Wu Ti Miao, Mendocino County.
Wu Ti Miao is a Taoist temple at 45160 Albion Street, City of Mendocino. It is dedicated to the
deity Kuan Ti (Kwan Kung). Originally designated the God of War, Kuan Ti is revered for his
courage
, loyalty, and personal sacrifice. The attributes account for much of his popularity among
the early Chinese immigrants
. A plaque outside the temple reads, "One of the oldest of
California's Chinese houses of worship in continuous use
, the temple may date back as far as
1854
, though its documented history reaches only to 1883. The Chinese built many temples in
California, but most ha
ve been destroyed and no others remain on the North Coast.” Inside, the
temple is complete
with altars, tapestries, and burners. The temple is California Historical
Landmark No. 927. Reference: Chace 1992: 23, 27; Wey 1988: 107,129-130. 

Modoc County
Alturas Chinatown, Modoc County.
Alturas Chinatown was next to the Pit River on the south side of Carlos Street and D Street in
the community of Alturas by 1874
. The Chinese who lived there were laundrymen and laborers
with one individual working as a cook. By 1880
, the Chinese population of the entire county
numbered only 17
. The number increased to 22 in 1890 and dropped to six by 1900 according
to the United States Census. The county's geographic isolation and abundant Native American
labor appear to account for the small number of Chinese. Reference: Cook n.d.
: 50; Dollaride
1998
; Sanborn Insurance Map 1888.
Modoc County Museum, Modoc County.
Modoc County Museum at 600 Main Street in the town of Alturas has a permanent exhibit of
Chi
nese artifacts.

Shasta County
Anderson Chinese Business Area, Shasta County.
Anderson Chinese business area was on the north and south side of the railroad tracks between
Redding Street and Cent
er Street and Howard Street and South Street in the town of Anderson.
It contained several Chinese laundries which had disappeared from the town by 1900. Reference:
Sanborn Insurance map 1889, 1900.
China Garden, Shasta County.
Located about three miles north of Balls Ferry, China Garden is on the north side of the
Sacramento River. The garden is one-half mile long and about one-tenth of a mile wide
. There
are extensive orchards throughout the area
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1965.
China Gardens, Shasta County.
China Gardens was located between Briggsville and Texas Springs. A small group of Chinese
lived at the site and cultivated vegetables
. The produce was sold in nearby mining towns. By the
early 1880's the site was abandoned
; Chinese were banned from living in the county. See Hong
Kong, Shasta County
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980.
China Gulch, Shasta County.
(1) China Gulch is a stream flowing in a northwest-to-southeast direction for three and one-half miles. It empties into a reservoir that was used in dredging operations. It is about two and one- half miles west of Olinda. Most of the 2-3,000 Chinese living in Shasta County in 1854 worked in the placer mining areas as laborers and miners. Reference: Steger 1966: 24; United States Geological Survey 1964.
(2) China Gulch is an intermittent stream that flows from north-to-south for about three quarters
of a mile where it empties into Cline Gulch
. There is a mine tunnel at the head of the stream. It
is about fi
ve miles north of the Whiskeytown Reservoir in Shasta National Forest. Reference:
United States Geological Survey 197ge.
China Gulch Drive, Shasta County.
China Gulch Drive has an east-west orientation and extends from Canyon Road to Oak Street in
the town of Cloverdale
. The entire area has experienced considerable gold mining activity.
Reference: Compass Maps 1989.
China Pit, Shasta County.
China Pit is the current name for the placer mine once known as Igo Chinese Workings. See Igo
Chinese Workings
, Shasta County.
Chinese Reservoir, Shasta County.
Chinese Reservoir is the name of the small body of water at Igo Chinese Workings. It was used
to process gold-bearing gravel at the mine
. See Igo Chinese Workings, Shasta County.
Hong Kong, Shasta County.
Hong Kong was located at the south end of Main Street near Middle Gate Road in the City of
Shasta
. By 1854, Hong Kong had a population of around 500 and 30 to 40 wooden and cloth
structures to include a hotel
, several stores, gambling places and temple. Anti-Chinese sentiments
were strong b
y 1859, resulting in the destruction of Hong Kong in that year. The site of Hong
Kong is within Shasta State Historic Park
. Reference: Office of Historic Preservation 1980;
Steger 1966: 39. 
Igo, Shasta County.
Igo is a community whose name may be related to early Chinese miners. See Igo-Ono, Shasta
County
.
Igo Chinese Workings, Shasta County.
Initially, Igo Chinese Workings was a placer mine developed in 1851 with the name of Igo/Piety
Hill Mine. About 600 Chinese laborers were brought into the area to expand the flume and ditch
system in the early 1860s. By 1884 the mine closed and the Euro Americans left but the Chinese
stayed. They continued to work the mine and it became an all-Chinese community by 1888
. Its
name is derived from that time. Reference
: Ritter 1986: 7-12.
 Igo-Ono, Shasta County.        .
Igo-Ono are two separate communities along Clear Creek Road off State Route 273. Yet, the
origin of their place names may be intertwined. One account of the place names pertains to Chinese
miners discovering gold in a nearby stream
. When news of the strike was heard, armed
Euro American miners appeared and demanded the Chinese lea
ve. Feeling threatened, the Chinese
said
, "I go, I go." Thus, that place became known as Igo. Moving to another stream, the Chinese
again struck gold
. Armed miners came and told the Chinese to leave. This time, instead of leaving,
they said, "Oh no, Oh no." Thus, the Chinese stayed and the locale became officially known as
Ono. Other versions of the names tell of a mine superintendent's young son who always cried
"I
go, I go” when his father left for the mine
. Some have suggested that Igo is actually a Native
American term applied to the town in the late 1870's. However, a post office was established in
1873 using the Igo name
. On the other hand, the name Ono may have been suggested by the
Reverend William Kidder, who chose it from the biblical Plains of Ono (Book of Chronicles)
.
Another account tells of the attempt to name the town with every proposed name being met by
the population with the statement, Oh no! Having exhausted the possibilities
, the people settled
on Ono. The name became official in 1883
. The true origin of the town names may never be
known. Reference
: Gudde 1947: 36, 58; Hoover 1990: 442; Minke 1974: 46, 51; Steger 1966:
40; Wong 1987: 285-286.
Ogo, Shasta County.
The name Ogo completes the trilogy of Igo-Ono-Ogo. Ogo is a state forestry fire fighter camp
one mile west of Ono
. See Igo-Ono, Shasta County. Reference: Steger 1966: 50.
Ono, Shasta County.
Ono is a small community near the Clear Creek Bridge about seven miles west from State Route
273 on Clear Creek Road
. The story of its name may be related to Igo and the Chinese. See Igo-
Ono, Shasta County.
Piety Hill. Shasta County.
The town site of Piety Hill was located on Cloverdale Road near the community of Igo. Established in 1849, it had about 1500 residents and 600 Chinese.  The Chinese were miners, vegetable growers and laborers. Many of the laborers dug a 21 mile-long water ditch for a local mining company. The community and Chinese were gone by the 1920's. See Igo, Shasta County. Reference: Swackhamer 2015.

Redding Chinatown, Shasta County.
The Chinese had been in the Redding area for many years and maintained a well-established
Chinatown within the city. Located on the north side of Shasta Street along the east side of
California Street
, it contained three laundries and 17 dwellings. However, the Chinese were
forced to evacuate because of anti-Chinese sentiment on January 27
, 1886. Reference: McGowan
1961
:328-329; Sanborn Insurance Map 1885.

                                                              Siskiyou County

China Bar, Siskiyou County.
Located on Klamath River, China Bar proved to be a rich source of placer gold for the Chinese
in the early 1850s. Reference
: Hoover 1966: 506.

China Creek, Siskiyou County.
(1) China Creek is near the town of Happy Camp. The stream flows through the Klamath
National Forest down the flanks of China Peak for two miles before it is joined by several
streams, most notably Wolf Creek and its south fork
. China Creek continues a little more than
two miles where it joins the Klamath River at China Point
. See China Point, Siskiyou County.
Reference
: DeLorme 1988: 24; United States Geological Survey 1980b.
(2) China Creek is a three and one-half mile-long stream that travels in a southwest direction
through Klamath National Forest
. The areas on both sides of the stream have experienced
considerable mining activity
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1978b.
(3) China Creek is two and one-half miles in length. It joins Blind Horse Creek about five and 
one-half miles southeast of Cecilville. Reference: United States Geological survey 1979d.
(4) China Creek flows less than one mile into Humboldt County about seven miles northwest of
Orleans in Humboldt County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1980a.

China Creek Mine, Siskiyou County.
China Creek Mine is near where China Creek empties into the Klamath River. It was purchased
from a Euro American at the turn of the century by Chinese, acquiring its present name. Estimates
of the gold recovered by the Chinese from the tunnel and shaft mine run as high as $200,000. See
China Creek
, Siskiyou County and China Point, Siskiyou County. Reference: Hendryx and Rock
1990
: 52; United States Geological Survey 1980b.

China Ditch, Siskiyou County.
Originally called the Big Ditch and constructed by non-Chinese, the water channel became known
as China Ditch because of subsequent improvements done to it by Chinese laborers. The ditch ran
for 96 miles and brought water from Parks Creek to mining claims along Yreka Creek
.
Reference: Hendryx and Rock 1990: 7.

China Grade Road, Siskiyou County.
China Grade Road is a seven-mile-long paved road on the south side of the Klamath River near
the town of Happy Camp. It winds next to the river and through the forest
. The last half-mile or
so is unpaved and takes one down to the river itself. Reference
: DeLorme 1988: 24.

China Gulch, Siskiyou County.
(1) China Gulch is a two mile-long stream that flows down from China Peak. It is about 15
miles west of Interstate Highway 5 on Highway 96. Evidence of extensive and large scale placer
mining is abundant
. See China Peak, Siskiyou County. Reference: United States Geological
Survey 1984a
(2) China Gulch Located on Scott Bar Mountain in the Klamath National Forest and has a one-half-mile-long stream that flows in a northwest to southeast direction. There are many mines in the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1983.
(3) China Gulch is a one-third of a mile stream that flows in an east-to-west direction. It joins Indian Creek within the Klamath National Forest. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1984b.
(4) China Gulch is an intermittent stream in the Klamath National Forest. It is one and one-half
miles in length
, flowing in a north-to-south manner where it joins North Fork of the Salmon
River. There are many mines in the area. Reference
: United States Geological Survey 1978a.
(5) China Gulch is a one and one-half mile-long stream that flows in an east-to-west direction where it joins North Russian Creek
. It is just north of Little China Gulch in the Klamath National Forest. There
has been considerable tunnel and shaft mining in the area. See
Little China Gulch, Siskiyou
County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1977.

China Mountain, Siskiyou County.
China Mountain in the Klamath National Forest reaches a height of 8,551 feet above sea level.
It is eight and one-half miles southwest of the town of Weed and is two miles due west of Stewart
Spring Road. There has been considerable mining activity on the flanks of the mountain
. See
South China Mountain, Siskiyou County. Reference
: United States Geological Survey 1986a.
China Peak, Siskiyou County.
(1) China Peak is a symmetrical peak standing majestically by itself with an elevation of 1,464 feet
above sea level
. Considerable placer mining has taken place around its flanks on the Klamath
River . China Peak is located about 15 miles west on Highway 96 from Interstate Highway
5
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1984b.
(2) China Peak is 4,169 feet above sea level and is the site of China Spring. The mountain is about
six miles east of the town of Happy Camp and on the east side of Highway 96
. See China Spring,
Siskiyou County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1980b.
China Peak Lookout Road, Siskiyou County.
China Peak Lookout Road is roughly eight miles east of Happy Camp on Highway 96 on the
south side of the road. A six-mile journey up the twisting
, paved road brings one to the China
Peak Lookout Tower
. See China Peak Lookout Tower, Siskiyou County. Reference: DeLorme
1988
: 24.
China Peak Lookout Tower, Siskiyou County.
Sitting on top of China Peak, China Peak Lookout Tower is a fire watch station occupied during
fire season
, Seen from below on Highway 96, the tower displays a remarkable similarity to a
Ming Dynasty Bell Tower
.
China Point, Siskiyou County.
(1) China Point is formed by a meander of the Klamath River where it is joined by China Creek1
about five miles east of the town of Happy Camp. The area was extensively worked by Chinese
miners even after others moved to richer strikes. Through the years, the Klamath River and China
Creek have continued to bring gold down from the higher elevations
. Thus, the precious metal can still be found in the gravel of China Point. See China Creek, Siskiyou County. Reference:
United States Geological Survey 1980b.
(2) China Point is a ridge about 2,600 feet above sea level on the north side of the North Fork of
the Salmon River
. It is about six miles northeast of the town of Forks of the Salmon. There is
evidence of placer mining and dredging throughout the area
. Reference: United States Geological
Survey 1979c.
Dunsmuir Chinese Business Area, Siskiyou County.
Located in the town of Dunsmuir behind the California Hotel near Florence Avenue, the
Dunsmuir Chinese business area had several laundries in1892
. However, they were gone by 1903.
Reference: Sanborn Insurance Map 1892, 1903.
Fong Wah Bar, Siskiyou County.
Gravel will accumulate within a stream and form what is known as a bar. Gold is often found
within such bars
, resulting in the presence of Chinese placer miners. Fong Wah Bar is about one
half-mile northwest of Fong Wah Gulch in the Klamath National Forest
. See Fong Wah Gulch,
Siskiyou County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1955.
Fong Wah Cemetery, Siskiyou County.
Fong Wah Cemetery near the Forks of the Salmon was used by Chinese between 1860 and 1930.
The name may be a variation on the term
"Chung Wah." It is on a high river terrace with evidence
of mining throughout the area
. There are thirteen depressions in the ground, suggesting the
number who were interred there. Artifacts such as a burial shroud and coffin have been found.
A fence was placed around the cemetery in 1978. Reference
: Hendryx and Rock 1990: 51.
Fong Wah Gulch, Siskiyou County.
Fong Wah Gulch has a stream about one mile in length that flows southwest-to-northeast into the Salmon River. It is approximately one mile northwest of the Fong Wah Cemetery. See Fong Wah Cemetery, Siskiyou County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1955.

Lee Han Mine, Siskiyou County.
The Lee Han Mine near Gottville represents a typical placer mine of the late 1870;s. Ranging in
size from 11 to 111 acres
, a mine averaged 40 acres. Pick, shovel and wheel barrow were used
to break up and move gold-bearing sand and gravel
. Ground sluicing was used to separate the
gold from rock
. Water for sluicing often came from a pump developed by the Chinese miners that
became known as the Chinese pump. It was essentially an adaptation of the water wheel used in
China to lift water from the irrigation ditch to the field. Reference
: "Chinese Mining .... " 1978:
7-8.
Little China Gulch, Siskiyou County.
Little china Gulch has a one-mile-long perennial stream that flows from east-to-west, eventually becoming part of North Russian Creek in Klamath National Forest. It is just south of China Gulch. The area has experienced considerable tunnel and shaft mining. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1977.

Louie Road, Siskiyou County.
Louie Road is south of Yreka off Interstate Highway 5. Gene Louie, the first Chinese American
Singles Tennis Champion, remembered tales about life in Sisk
iyou County as told by his father.
Reference: Hendryx and Rock 1990: 48.
Siskiyou County Museum, Siskiyou County.
Siskiyou County Museum at 910 South Main Street in the town of Yreka has an exhibit of
Chinese artifacts
.
South China Mountain, Siskiyou County.
South China Mountain is two miles southwest of China Mountain and just west of the Pacific
Crest National Scenic Trai
l. It measures 8,206 feet above sea level. Like China Mountain, there
has been considerable mining act
ivity on its slopes. See China Mountain, Siskiyou County.
Reference: Compass Maps 1989.
Yreka Center Street Chinatown, Siskiyou County.
Yreka Center Street Chinatown was the second Chinatown of Yreka. Located on the east end of
C
enter Street, it appeared in 1889. By the 1930's, both Chinatowns were gone. See Yreka Main
Street Chinatown
, Siskiyou County. Reference: Hendryx and Rock 1990: 19-21.
Yreka Main Street Chinatown, Siskiyou County.
Yreka Main Street Chinatown, dating to the 1850's, was the first Chinatown. It was located
around the inte
rsection of Main Street and Center Street. See Yreka Chinese Cemetery, Siskiyou
Count
y. Reference: Hendryx and Rock 1990 19-21.
Yreka Chinese Cemetery, Siskiyou County.
Initially, deceased Chinese were buried in the Euro American cemetery of Yreka. However, after
several de
vastating fires within the community and the cemetery fence completely burned in 1877,
the Yreka Board of Trustees passed a motion by which another site was to be selected for a
Chinese cemetery
. The site, announced on September 4, 1877, was Butcher Hill on present-day
M
ontaque Highway. The rationale for establishing a separate cemetery appears to have been
rooted in the perception by non
-Chinese that Chinese burial practices involving the burning of
paper objects cau
sed the fires. Today, a stone marker commemorates the site and reads, "The
graveyard of our friends
. Erected in the Mid-summer of the 26th year of Emperor Kwong Shui."
The Chinese Histo
rical Society of America was instrumental in preserving the site. Reference:
Hendryx and Rock 1990: 15, 19,23,33-34,74; Wacher 1988.

Trinity County
China Creek, Trinity County.
(1) China Creek is in Trinity National Forest. It flows northeast into South Fork of the Salmon
Ri
ver. See China Spring, Trinity County. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1979d.

(2) China Creek is a perennial stream is five miles long and travels in an east-to-west direction within the
Trinit
y National Forest. It merges with New River near the community of Dailey. There has been wide 
spread mining activity throughout the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982c.
(3) China Creek in Trinity National Forest, flows all year in an east-to-west direction. There has
been c
onsiderable mining in the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982h.
(4) China Creek is located in Six Rivers National Forest and is an east flowing stream that cuts through
China Flat and joins the Tr
inity River. See China Flat, Trinity County. Reference: United States
Geological Survey 1979a.
(5) China Creek is about two miles long and moves in a northeast-to-southwest direction in the
Trinity National Forest
. It joins the North Fork of the Trinity River. There is extensive evidence
of mining along the creek
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982i.
(6) China Creek in Shasta National Forest is almost one mile in length and moves in an east-to-
west direction. It joins the East Fork of the Trinity River three miles north of where the Trinity
flows into Clair Engle Lake. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1986b.
China Flat, Trinity County.
The broad flat area known as China Flat sits on the west side of the Trinity River in Six Rivers
National Forest
. China Creek flows through it. See China Creek, Trinity County. Reference:
United States Geological Survey 1979b.
China Garden, Trinity County.
Located across from the Weaverville Joss House State Park, China Garden was a vegetable
garden in the la
te 1800's. Presently, it is the parking lot for the Trinity Market. Reference: Jones
1981: 129
.
China Gardens Camp, Trinity County.
China Gardens Camp is an abandoned site on the north side of Grizzly Creek in the Salmon
Mountains, Trinity National Forest. It is north of Helena. Reference: United States Geological
Survey 1979a
.
China Grave Yard No.1, Trinity County.
This was an additional name for Ten Cents Gulch Chinese Cemetery of Weaverville. See Ten
Cents Gulch Chinese Cemeter
y, Trinity County.
China Gulch, Trinity County.
(1) China Gulch has a north-to-south flowing stream about one and one-quarter miles in length.
It joins Little Browns Creek four and one-half miles northeast of Weaverville. Considerable placer
mining has occurred i
n the area. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982d.
(2) China Gulch,site of Chinese placer mining, is a small stream almost three-quarters of a mile 
in length that enters the Trinity River. It is four miles east of Moon Lim Lee Rest Area on the
north side of High
way 299. See Moon Lim Lee Rest Area, Trinity County. Reference: United
States Geological Surve
y 1952.
(3) China Gulch is where Chinese placer miners worked the stream that is a tributary of McKenzie
Gu
lch and is approximately three-quarters of a mile outside Weaverville on the north side of
Highway 299. Reference
: DeLorme 1988: 45.
(4) China Gulch is a stream that flows four miles in a north-to-south direction, eventually merging with Hayfork Creek in Trinity National Forest. There has been mining activity throughout the gulch. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982a.
(5) China Gulch is a stream one and one-half miles in length, flowing in a southwest-to-northeast
manner in Trinity National Forest
. It joins the larger South Fork of Indian Creek. There has been
mining activity throughout the gulch. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1984b.
China Hill Mine; Trinity County.
China Hill Mine is about six and one-half miles southeast of Weaverville next to Trinity River.
The area between the Trinity River and China Hill immediately west of the river was mined
extensively by the Chinese
, hence, its name. Reference: Jones 1981: 171.
China Peak, Trinity County.
China Peak is within Trinity National Forest and is 1,647 feet above sea level. There has been
considerable mining around the peak
. Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982f.
China Slide, Trinity County.  
China Slide is about 45 miles west of Weaverville on Highway 299 in a steep, rugged area along 
the Trinity River. A large landslide occurred in the area in 1881. Although others refused to work 
the gold-bearing gravel deposits because of the threat of landslides, the Chinese leased the
property
. They were successful until January 3, 1890, when a landslide occurred. The slide
measured about one-third of a mile in length and one-tenth of a mile in width
. It killed two
Chinese miners, dammed the river and created a lake twelve miles in length
. Reference: Gudde
1969: 63; Jones 1981: 246-47; United States Geological Survey 1982e
.
China Spring, Trinity County.
China Spring, located in an area of mining activity, is approximately three-tenths of a mile
northwest of China Creek in Trinity National Forest
. It is the source of water for China Creek.
Reference: United States Geological Survey 1979d.
China Springs, Trinity County.
China Springs is located on the east side of Backbone Ridge, Trinity National Forest. It is the
water source for China Springs Gulch
. See China Springs Gulch, Trinity County. Reference:
United States Geological Survey 1982i.
China Springs Gulch, Trinity County.
The stream in China Springs Gulch has water flowing all year and is about seven
tenths of a mile long
. It meets the North Fork of the Trinity River in Trinity National Forest.
Reference: United States Geological Survey 1982i.
Hawthorne Street, Trinity County.
Hawthorne Street is in the town of Weaverville. It is named in honor of Moon Lim Lee's elder
brother
, Sam Hawthorne Lee, Jr. See Moon Lim Lee Rest Area, Trinity County. Reference:
Wong 1987: 280.


Junction City Chinatown, Trinity County.
Junction City Chinatown was at Bridge Street and Main Street in Junction City and had 51
Chinese residents by 1886
. A Chinese child started a fire that consumed the entire Chinatown in
1889. It was not rebuilt
. Reference: Jones 1981: 160-161.

Lewiston Temple, Trinity County.
The community of Lewiston was the home of many Chinese who worked in the local mines.
There was reportedly a Chinese temple there
. Reference: Wells 1962: 37.

Moon Alley, Trinity County.
This is a short street in the town of Weaverville. It is near the home of Moon Lee and was named
in his honor
. See Moon Lim Lee Rest Area, Trinity County. Reference: Wong 1987: 280.

Moon Lim Lee Rest Area, Trinity County.
Moon Lim Lee Rest Area is located about one mile north of the junction of Highway 3 and
Highway 299
. It was named in honor of Moon Lim Lee by the State of California Transportation
Department
. Moon Lim Lee's name comes from the activities of his father, Lim Sue Kin. The
father ran a Weaverville restaurant in the late 1800s with the name
, Sam Lee. Located on Main
Street, its name means three fold prosperity in a Cantonese dialect
. Lim Sue Kin became widely
known as Sam Lee
. Thus, the family name changed in a manner not uncommon for that period.
Moon Lim Lee was a prominent businessman and served on many boards and committees that
worked for the betterment of local communities and highways of Trinity County
. He was
appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the California High
way Commission in 1967 and
served as a commissioner for eight years
. His effort in saving Won Lim Miao helped produce
Weaverville Joss House State Park
. A plaque at the rest area reads, "Moon Lim Lee. 1903-1985.
A man who with his wife Dorothy Sue Lee, served his state, community, and cultural heritage
with infinite distinction, warmth, generosity
, and energy. The extent of his extraordinary service
was equaled only by the number of his friends and those he helped
. This monument is dedicated as
a tribute to all the love and benefits he bestowed upon this land and its people. Rotary Club of Weaverville and friends." See Weaverville Joss House State Park, State Park, Trinity County; Won Lim Miao, Trinity CountyReference: Jones 1981: 128; Louie 1998:148; McDonald 1986: 11,32; Rotary Club 1992; Wong 1987: 240-281Photo
Mun Loa Spring, Trinity County.
Mun Loa Spring is between the mouth of Oregon Gulch and Skyranch. It exits the side of a hill
ne
xt to the Trinity River and flows year-round. Using water from the spring, a Chinese man
known a
s Mun Loa, established a garden on the nearby river terrace. The vegetables from the
garden were sold throughout the area
. As people began to associate the man with the spring, it
gradually became known by his name
. Reference: Jones 1981: 172-73.
Ohio Flat Mining District, Trinity County.
The Ohio Flat Mining District is four miles west of Lewiston on the Trinity River and was
conside
red a Chinese placer mining area. This resulted from it being registered as a mining claim
b
y the She Lim Company in 1860. It was worked primarily by the Chinese until at least 1885. The
claim
covered 1250 feet of river bank. Reference: Kelly and McAleer 1986: 5~i 1, 23-24.
Old Weaverville Fire Station, Trinity County.
The fire station is the last surviving building of Weaverville Chinatown. A plaque on the front of
the building reads
: "Old Weaverville Fire Station. This building with the rammed earth walls was
constructed by the
Weaverville Fire District and was their fire station until 1949. In 1949, the
lo
cal Fire District, with funding from the California Department of Parks and Recreation and the
l
ocal Rotary Club, built a protective structure to preserve the rammed earth walls. Dedicated by
the Native Sons of the Golden
West, James M. Smith Grand President, October 11, 1980. In
memor
y of the U.S. Senator, James D. Phelan." Reference: Wong 1987: 263-264.
Sam Lee Drive, Trinity County.
Sam Lee Drive in the town of Weaverville commemorates Moon Lim Lee's father. See Moon Lim
Lee Rest Area, Trinit
y County. Reference: Wong 1987: 280.
Sze Yup Cemetery, Trinity County.
The Sze Yup District Association operated the cemetery located in Ten Cents Gulch outside of
Weaverville after 1904, when it pur
chased the property. It was increased in size by 0.4 acres soon
thereafter
. The cemetery was repaired in 1967 at which time E. Clampus Vitus built a wooden
gate. By
1987, only one tombstone, that of Jue Tuey buried in 1973, remained. The cemetery is
said to have good feng shui. See Ten Cents Gulch Chinese Cemetery, Trinity County. Reference:
Wong 1987: 293-294.
Ten Cents Gulch Chinese Cemetery, Trinity County.
Ten Cents Gulch was the site of an unofficial cemetery for Chinese dating to the 1860's. It was
at the end of G
lenn Road near Weaverville and was often called China Grave Yard No.1. The
Sze
Yup District Association purchased the property in 1904. See Sze Yup Cemetery, Trinity
County
. Reference: Wong 1987: 293-294.

Tong War Site of Weaverville, Trinity County.
See
Weaverville Elementary School, Trinity County.

Weaverville Chinatown, Trinity County.
The demise of the Weaverville Chinatown is recorded on a Main Street plaque that states, “Weaverville Chinatown. Chinatown business district was centered in the area on September 10, 1874. Fire destroyed everything from the corner of Highway 3 and Main Street to the Pacific Brewery, except for four adobe buildings. Again on September 10, 1905, fire destroyed all of the buildings on both sides of the street except for the four adobe buildings. On April 15, 1977, fire destroyed three adobe buildings owned by the Sam Lee family. Trinitarians Chapter No. 62, E. Clampus Vitus, July 21, 1979.” Reference: Wong, 1987: 262.
Won Lim Miao, Trinity County.
Won Lim Miao is the oldest Taoist temple in California that has been in continuous use as a place
of worship
. Its name means "Temple Amongst the Forest Beneath the Clouds." Built in 1874, it
contains a monk's quarters and a larger room for worship. Three altars inside are dedicated to the
gods of Health, Wealth
, and Mercy--all important to those far from home. With a decline in
Chinese population by 1934
, the temple fell into disrepair with most of the original contents lost.
The Weaverville Chamber of Commerce and others sought to preserve the temple, possibly as a
state park
. Moon Lim Lee was appointed trustee of the temple in 1938 and actively pursued the
idea of it becoming a state park, which occurred in 1956
. The park officially opened in 1957 after
extensive renovation
. In 1961, it became California Historical Landmark No. 709. Presently, it
has more than 40
,000 visitors per year. Being a place of worship, the facility is closed to the
public on days of significance to practicing Taoists
. See Moon Lim Lee Rest Area, Trinity
County
. Reference: McDonald 1986: 12-29; State of California n.d. Photo
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